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The Knowledge Server

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Please find my work entitled 'knowledge server' at www.nell.tk You can use your the knowledge server to organize your thoughts.

  • What shall we know and learn in a world where there is no work, matter and rule?

    Every work is an example of work.

    Every matter, living or nonliving, is an example of matter.

    Every rule is an example of rule.

    What shall we know and learn in a world where there is no work, matter and rule?

    8 AnswersPhilosophy7 years ago
  • Do you argee with this?

    The primary duty of every true teacher is to direct and assist students to know, classify and list all the possible knowledge about anything and everything.

    Learning to classify knowledge is important. That permits research in the proper field, from agriculture to zoology. And, it permits guessing that there are similarities between horses and zebras.

    Effective comprehension and application knowledge is possible only if the knowledge is systematically classified and organized.

    Modern teachers do not direct students to classifiy knowledge, because it will expose the limits & similarities in our knoweledge about things around us.

    Our knowledge about anything is infinite! This statement from teachers suggests students not to make any attempt to list and classify all the possible knowledge about anything and everything; it is not possible to list because our knowledge about anything is infinite! In fact, our knowledge about anything is finite, and we can list all the possible knowledge about anything of our choice. Teachers should stop saying that our knowledge about anything and everything is infinite, because it is a false statement which misguides students!

    6 AnswersPhilosophy8 years ago
  • Do you disagree with me regarding this?

    “The primary duty of every true teacher is to direct and assist students to know and list all the possible knowledge about anything and everything!”

    9 AnswersPhilosophy8 years ago
  • Teachers, Please Stop Misguiding Students!?

    About anything, we can know: 1. its parts, 2. its uniqueness, 3. its connections, 4. its sensitivities, 5. its forms, 6. its substitutes, and 7. its uses. But, do we know them? Do we have the complete information about them? For many things, we have incomplete information regarding these seven aspects. We can list the things about which we do not have information on all the seven aspects and identify them as things about which we have incomplete information and plan research to get those information.

    For instance, we know breast. About a breast, we can know: 1. its all parts, 2. its exact uniqueness, 3. its all connections, 4. its all sensitivities, 5. its all forms, 6. its all substitutes, and 7. its all uses. About breast, we have incomplete information regarding these seven aspects.

    We know many women. About any woman, we can know: 1. her all parts, 2. her exact uniqueness, 3. her all connections, 4. her all sensitivities, 5. her all forms, 6. her all substitutes, and 7. her all uses. About any woman, we have incomplete information regarding these seven aspects.

    We know our tooth. About any tooth, we can know: 1. its all parts, 2. its exact uniqueness, 3. its all connections, 4. its all sensitivities, 5. its all forms, 6. its all substitutes, and 7. its all uses. About tooth, we have incomplete information regarding these seven aspects. Extensive research must be done to get information regarding these aspects.

    We know computer. About any computer, we can know: 1. its all parts, 2. its exact uniqueness, 3. its all connections, 4. its all sensitivities, 5. its all forms, 6. its all substitutes, and 7. its all uses. About computer, we have incomplete information regarding these seven aspects.

    About anything, we have to collect information on: 1. its parts, 2. it uniqueness, 3. its connections, 4. its sensitivities, 5. its forms, 6. its substitutes, and 7. its uses.

    Is teaching difficult?

    Full page at:

    http://knowledgeserver.wordpress.com/user-guide/

    1 AnswerPhilosophy8 years ago
  • Could you rephrase these in simple philosophical terms?

    Congratulations!

    This User Guide will take you to the applications of theory of Sivashanmugam, and will help you to better enjoy it in your day to day life.

    In Information Collection

    We search books and internet to collect information. About anything, no single book gives all the information. To collect all the available information about anything, we should know: what are the information which we have to collect about it? In this regard, the theory of Sivashanmugam acts as ‘knowledge Based Information Collection System (KBICS).’ About anything, we have to collect information on: 1. its parts, 2. it uniqueness, 3. its connections, 4. its sensitivities, 5. its forms, 6. its substitutes, and 7. its uses.

    In our search for information, we would get information on all the seven aspects only for very few things. For many things, we won’t get information on all the seven aspects. We can list those things about which we do not have information on all the seven aspects and identify them as things which need further research.

    For Instantaneous Speech Power

    Many of us fail to recollect and organize information when called for an instantaneous speech. In this connection, the theory of Sivashanmugam shall help us to recollect and organize the speech on anything.

    In Teaching

    Many teachers randomly deliver information to students. Few teachers systematically instruct & guide students to collect information. The theory of Sivashanmugam teach students in information collection by systematically instructing: what are the information which we have to collect about anything? Repeating a set of instructions is not same as repeating a set of same information.

    Many students often feel uneasy with the volumes and volumes of voluminous books. Only very few teachers speak on the possible knowledge about anything and help students to anticipate those which is written books.

    In making a distinction between knowledge and opinion

    Our opinions contract with each other. But, nothing contradicts our true knowledge, as evidenced by the theory of Sivashanmugam.

    In developing a Simple Unified Instructional System (SUIS)

    Teaching is the art of instructing students, not dumping information on student minds. The theory of Sivashanmugam forms the basis for developing a simple unified instructional system which would help students how to study anything and everything. No instructional system can be developed without knowing the possible knowledge about anything.

    source: http ://knowledgeserver.wordpress. com/user-guide/ [Please remove the space in the url]

    1 AnswerPhilosophy8 years ago
  • What we can know about anything and everything is finite, not infinite. Can you refute?

    The site at: www.nell.tk clearly illustrates that what we can know about anything and everything is finite, not infinite.

    Can you refute that?

    10 AnswersPhilosophy8 years ago
  • What are your comments to improve my philosophy?

    I have posted my philosophy at: WWW.NECK.TK

    Please offer your comments to improve it.

    4 AnswersPhilosophy8 years ago
  • What would be the future of my work? Will it stand with the test of time?

    My work entitled 'the knowledge server' is posted at: www.tuxi.tk

    Will it stand with the test of time?

    5 AnswersPhilosophy8 years ago
  • Will this be useful to students?

    Please find my work entitled 'knowledge server' at: www.tuks.tk

    Will this be useful to students in organizing their thoughts?

    3 AnswersPhilosophy8 years ago
  • What are your comments on this?

    I have posted my work entitled "we know our knowledge" at: www. alphabets. tk

    I like to hear your comments for improvements.

    3 AnswersPhilosophy8 years ago
  • Do you agree with me?

    All of you will agree with me now!!!

    # What can I know about a computer?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a flower?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a nation?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a river?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a mountain?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a number?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about an equation?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a rose?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a car?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about a sea?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    # What can I know about x?

    About it, you can never know:

    1. its parts,

    2. its abundance,

    3. its connections,

    4. its sensitivities,

    5. its forms,

    6. its substitutes, and

    7. its uses.

    No trouble. Be happy!!!

    8 AnswersPhilosophy9 years ago
  • Are the following questions worthless pseudophilosophical drivels?

    Are the following questions worthless pseudophilosophical drivels?

    # What can I know about a computer?

    # What can I know about a flower?

    # What can I know about a nation?

    # What can I know about a river?

    # What can I know about a mountain?

    # What can I know about a number?

    # What can I know about an equation?

    # What can I know about a rose?

    # What can I know about a car?

    # What can I know about a sea?

    # What can I know about x?

    One should not simply dismiss these questions as worthless pseudophilosophical drivels. No intelligent man would say that these questions are worthless pseudophilosophical drivel!!!!

    The answers to these questions may be same and reduce the market value of education.

    7 AnswersPhilosophy9 years ago