Lv 614,005 points

formeng

Favourite answers27%
Answers2,496
  • Is Hawk Newsome who threatened to burn down the country a modern day storm trooper?

    He's leader of the NY BLM. He said on Fox News if he didn't get what he waned, he'd burn down the country and rebuild it.

    3 AnswersPolitics3 months ago
  • Shouldn't the organizers of the demonstrations be sued by those whose property was destroyed?

    They exercised no control over the demonstrations, provided a Trojan horse for the criminals, and used the criminal's actions to strengthen their demands.

    2 AnswersLaw & Ethics4 months ago
  • Please translate Spanish to English?

    I received the following from someone asking me for help. Would someone who knows Spanish please translate for me. "es que lo que pasa es que al momento de querer usar alguna multiplicación negativa o potencia, que tengo que hacer para cambiar eso? se lo agradecería." I think they are asking how to multiply negative numbers and raise to negative powers, but I can't figure out how "change (cambiar)" fits into the question.

    Thanks much for your help.

    formeng

    1 AnswerLanguages7 years ago
  • Comment on Best Selection?

    Is there a way other than "Comments" to answer an additional questions asked by the asker about a response that has been chosen best. I know that I can comment, but that only allows 250 characters.

    Thanks,

    formeng

    1 AnswerMathematics8 years ago
  • What are right linear and left linear languages?

    I've run across the terms right linear and left linear languages. Does right linear mean they read from right to left and left liner the opposite? Also, I saw this: A grammar is said to be right linear if all of the rules are of the form A-->xB, A-->x. Left linear are of the form A-->Bx and A-->x. What does that mean? Thanks a million in advance.

    formeng

    1 AnswerLanguages9 years ago
  • Dejé caer and se me cayó Spanish experts.?

    A friend tells me that "Dejé caer las gafas" and "Se me cayó las gafas" mean the same. I'm curious if perhaps "dejé caer" is more akin to the English to let go. That is, perhaps unavoidably, but with intention. And if "Se me cayó" means without intention. Obviously, neither of us knows the subtleties of Spanish. So, thanks to you experts in advance.

    formeng

    6 AnswersLanguages10 years ago
  • Short C++ program for comment pairs?

    Could any of you tell me where I can find a short program--not one to buy--to search C++ code for unpaired block comment symbols? That is, one that has only an opening or closing symbol rather than both. If not, could you give me some hints on how to write one? Thanks so much in advance.

    formeng

    2 AnswersProgramming & Design10 years ago
  • Prevelance of use of informal Spanish. Native speakers especially?

    Several years ago I had a course in Spanish, and the teacher stressed that we not use the informal (Tú) forms until we knew someone quite well. Recently I had occasion to correspond with a man in Spain and he said that practice was no longer observed, and he insisted that I use the informal. Our class didn't focus much on the informal, so I had to do some studying. What I would appreciate knowing is if it's still best to use the formal until you know some quite well or if that's no longer applicable. Thanks so much in advance for your advise and opinions.

    FE

    5 AnswersLanguages1 decade ago
  • Spanish to English translation - Native Spanish speakers, please.?

    What exactly what does this sentence mean? A continuación paso a corregir tu texto de español.

    I know it means something like, "I will go on to correct your Spanish text," but what is an accurate translation?

    Thanks in advance.

    FE

    3 AnswersLanguages1 decade ago
  • Native Spanish speakers. Do you use "se me" in your conversation?

    I sometimes wonder if some of the Spanish grammar I am learning isn't used mostly by literary types. One thing in particular is the use of the reflexive for such things as losing, dropping, and forgetting. Do you frequently use structures such as the following in ordinary conversation? "Se me perdieron las llaves." "Se te cayeron las copas." "Se les cayó la copa. If you use them, what do you intend to indicate by the reflexive that wouldn't be there in another structure without it?

    Thanks in advance,

    FE

    3 AnswersLanguages1 decade ago
  • What is bioinformatics?

    My daughter is thinking of getting a master's degree in bioinformatics. Can someone tell me or tell me where to find information about salary levels, what they actually do, and what the future potential is in this field? I 've done some Googling, but didn't find enough specifics. I also posted this on the biology site.

    Thanks in advance!

    FE

    1 AnswerProgramming & Design1 decade ago
  • What is bioinformatics?

    My daughter is thinking of getting a master's degree in bioinformatics. Can someone tell me or tell me where to find information about salary levels, what they actually do, and what the future potential is in this field? I 've done some Googling, but didn't find enough specifics.

    Thanks in advance!

    FE

    1 AnswerBiology1 decade ago
  • Answer follow-up question.?

    Suppose I have answered a question and the poster asks a follow-up question on that same post. Is there a way other than "Comments" to respond to that question if the responder has blocked contact? Many thanks.

    1 AnswerYahoo Answers1 decade ago
  • Use of llevar vs. usar - Prefer native Spanish speakers?

    Hi,

    I am not a native Spanish speaker as you will immediately see. When I use conjugations of "llevar" for wear, some native speakers look at me like I'm some kind of mutant species :-) and others kindly tell me that I should use "usar." Would some of you native Spanish speakers please tell me whether the use of usar is so prevalent that I should stop using llevar, and perhaps give me some guidance about what countries use one or the other.

    Thanks in advance.

    FE

    5 AnswersLanguages1 decade ago
  • When do I use que vs. el/la cual - Spanish?

    Hi,

    Would some of you native Spanish speakers or Spanish grammarians please tell me when to use la/el cual, etc. rather than que or el/la que. From what I can discern from reading newspapers, etc. a preposition must come before el/la cual, but que can be used without a preposition. However, la/el que seems to be a direct substitute for el/la cual after a preposition. Is that all there is to it or is there something deeper?

    FE

    4 AnswersLanguages1 decade ago