• If everything was invisible, what would we see?

    By "everything was invisible", I mean absolutely EVERYTHING. This includes subatomic particles, physical objects and even light itself.
    By "everything was invisible", I mean absolutely EVERYTHING. This includes subatomic particles, physical objects and even light itself.
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • Why did Einstein invent relativity?

    Time was doing just fine before he came along and bent it with his gravity machine and screwed up the whole flow of things. The speed of light wouldn't be relevant to frame of reference either. It would just do what it does best- shine at 186,000 mps, no questions asked. Sometimes scientists just just leave... show more
    Time was doing just fine before he came along and bent it with his gravity machine and screwed up the whole flow of things. The speed of light wouldn't be relevant to frame of reference either. It would just do what it does best- shine at 186,000 mps, no questions asked. Sometimes scientists just just leave well enough alone.
    22 answers · 4 days ago
  • How to pet the schrodinger's cat?

    How to pet the schrodinger's cat?

    Best answer: How? One way would be to make sure the box used is one of those clear laboratory glove boxes scientists use to handle that which must remain contained -- but one whose exterior has been painted to render it opaque, preferably with lead paint to protect the petter from the ambient radiation within, which would also... show more
    Best answer: How? One way would be to make sure the box used is one of those clear laboratory glove boxes scientists use to handle that which must remain contained -- but one whose exterior has been painted to render it opaque, preferably with lead paint to protect the petter from the ambient radiation within, which would also require the gloves be lead-lined.

    You see, petting a cat wouldn't necessarily betray to the petter whether or not the cat is alive or dead, especially if a gas were also introduced that would render the cat unconscious. Not being able to tell whether the cat is alive or dead is really all that would be required for it to remain a so-called Schroedinger's cat.
    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is it common for people to have electricity spark come from their blankets?

    Best answer: Such sparks are quite common when the humidity is low which is typically during winter in the northern hemisphere. What you are seeing is static electricity. It's caused by rubbing two dissimilar materials resulting in electrons to build up on one material and to be depleted in the other. Technically, the spark... show more
    Best answer: Such sparks are quite common when the humidity is low which is typically during winter in the northern hemisphere. What you are seeing is static electricity. It's caused by rubbing two dissimilar materials resulting in electrons to build up on one material and to be depleted in the other. Technically, the spark is the electrical discharge between the two charged surfaces. It's the same phenomena as lightning but at a much lower in voltage and is harmless.

    With high or 'normal' humidity, the excess/lack of charges rapidly dissipate and equalize into the atmosphere. But dry air is an excellent conductor and the charges do not flow through it easily. The result is a the static discharge or spark you see jumping from one of the charged materials to the other.

    You can have some fun with static electricity. Pull the blanket over your head, rub it, and the spark will briefly light up your bed. If the air is dry enough simply combing your hair results in static charges and making it difficult to comb as your hair tends to stick to the comb. Pulling a heavy wool sweater (other fibers work too) over your head can cause large sparks between your head and the sweater.

    You will probably hear the crackle of larger sparks.

    With your blanket or sweater or other cause of a static electric spark you will likely smell the distinctive odor of ozone. The spark has enough energy to cause some regular oxygen in the air, O2, to become O3 which is ozone. It's not harmful and quickly dissipates and breaks down again to O2 but its smell is unique.

    The actual spark can be many thousands of volts but the current is quite low so it is not harmful to animals but the shock can be very uncomfortable. Scuff your shoes on a carpet in the winter and reach to touch an unsuspecting victim. The shock will get their attention! Or you can shock yourself on most any metallic object. The screws which hold in a light switch plate are wonderful at creating an unsuspected shock when reaching to turn on a light.

    I had a long haired cat who liked to nuzzle. I'd pet the cat. Purring, she'd nuzzle against my hand and get an uncomfortable shock on her nose yet she'd do it all over again. (Holding the cat's ear or nose helped eliminate the shock.)
    5 answers · 1 day ago
  • Pls explain?

    Pls explain?

    4 answers · 5 hours ago
  • Please provide a suitable explanation for answer C?
  • If F_magnetic=q v x B why do two unmoving magnets experience force?

    Best answer: The formula is for an *electrical charge* (q) moving in a magnetic field. It has *nothing* to do with with 2 stationary magnets. Or maybe you are thinking at a more fundamental level - in which case note that orbital electrons in atoms generate an atom's magnetic field. So orbital electrons in other atoms... show more
    Best answer: The formula is for an *electrical charge* (q) moving in a magnetic field.
    It has *nothing* to do with with 2 stationary magnets.

    Or maybe you are thinking at a more fundamental level - in which case note that orbital electrons in atoms generate an atom's magnetic field. So orbital electrons in other atoms will experience a force (greatly oversimplified description).
    4 answers · 7 hours ago
  • How many revolutions of the drum will occur before it comes to a complete stop?

    A washing machine drum is rotating at 1200rpm during its spin cycle. The lid is opened which causes a braking system to stop the drum from turning. If the tub comes to a complete stop in 8 seconds, how many revolutions of the drum will occur before it comes to a complete stop?
    A washing machine drum is rotating at 1200rpm during its spin cycle. The lid is opened which causes a braking system to stop the drum from turning. If the tub comes to a complete stop in 8 seconds, how many revolutions of the drum will occur before it comes to a complete stop?
    4 answers · 12 hours ago
  • An airplane is flying as the speed of sound is said to be at Mach 1. If the speed of sound is 331.45 m/s, what is the speed of the airplane?

    at Mach 2.56? Answer in units of mi/s
    at Mach 2.56? Answer in units of mi/s
    5 answers · 23 hours ago
  • Average acceleration rate problem please help?

    Need to find the average acceleration rate if initial velocity is 0 and final is 44 in a .1 miles stretch, not 1 mile, but .1 miles? The times elapsed would be 45 secs
    Need to find the average acceleration rate if initial velocity is 0 and final is 44 in a .1 miles stretch, not 1 mile, but .1 miles? The times elapsed would be 45 secs
    5 answers · 23 hours ago
  • What is spin of a particle in quantum mechanics?

    Best answer: No one really knows. It has certain mathematical similarities to the rotation of a body which is where it picked up the name spin, but it is not really spin, that is more of an analogy. It just another of those QM things we can'r really interpret beyond saying it is another degree of freedom that particles have.
    Best answer: No one really knows. It has certain mathematical similarities to the rotation of a body which is where it picked up the name spin, but it is not really spin, that is more of an analogy. It just another of those QM things we can'r really interpret beyond saying it is another degree of freedom that particles have.
    8 answers · 4 days ago
  • How far does a cord reach?

    Best answer: never quite enough to activate something
    Best answer: never quite enough to activate something
    10 answers · 5 days ago
  • Physics help?

    A cardboard box of unknown mass is sliding upon a mythical frictionless surface. The box has a velocity of 4.56 m/s when it encounters a bit of friction. After sliding 0.6 m, the box has a velocity of 3.33 m/s. What is the coefficient of friction of the surface?
    A cardboard box of unknown mass is sliding upon a mythical frictionless surface. The box has a velocity of 4.56 m/s when it encounters a bit of friction. After sliding 0.6 m, the box has a velocity of 3.33 m/s. What is the coefficient of friction of the surface?
    4 answers · 3 days ago