Chaos is inherent in all compounded things. Strive on with diligence.?

Buddha...

Explain please?

Update:

Wow thanks everyone!

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  • P'ang
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    "Chaos is inherent in all compounded things" is most likely a mistranslation of what Buddha said.

    Buddha did say that "suffering (dukkha) is inherent in all compounded things."

    Dukkha is a term that can be translated as suffering, dissatisfaction, unease, anguish or with any other word which suggests that things aren't quite right. The Sanskrit term originally had the meaning of a "rusted axle" on a cart - a wheel that wouldn't turn.

    "Compounded things" refers to al mental phenomena - the forms, feelings, perceptions, thought formations, and consciousness that we consider to be our "mind." If we study mental phenomena carefully (through meditation), we will see that every mental experience is compounded - it breaks into smaller and smaller parts.

    This is part of what makes compounded things unsatisfactory.

    Buddha also said that all compounded things are "impermanent" (perhaps this is the origin of the word "chaos") and also lack any essential nature (self or soul).

    The Buddha encouraged us to strive with diligence because when we experience the truth of our lives - that everything is impermanent, lacks an essential nature, and is marked with dissatisfaction - then we gain the great freedom of enlightenment.

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  • 1 decade ago

    When you look at the smallest of scales in our world you will find a chaotic nature to things (atoms, particles, energy, light, genetic mutations, etc). The complexity will boggle your mind with the seemingly random nature of everything around us.

    But do not let this worry or upset you, strive on with your life and continue doing what you can to create a better world.

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  • 3 years ago

    Strive On

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  • 1 decade ago

    Everything that is not inherently simple in nature (ie: everything) is chaotic and prone to pluralistic interpretations. Always keep this in mind.

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