Risk of fatty liver - need some clarification?

I undergone for ultrasound (abdomen) for some other reason... but i got following report regarding my liver ...

Normal in size with diffuse increase in echotexture.

No focal altration in echotexture.

Intrahepatic biliary radicles appear normal

Common duct messures normal ...

Impression : fatty liver

I don't know, what is the risk of this problem & how should i treat this. Frnds are saying that... diet can simply reduce this fat... if not, then i may get a chance for Diabetes also ... Can someone clarify this ?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    According to what you posted as your test results...you have Simple fatty liver. Let me explain what happens.

    Some of the causes of this can be hereditary, weight gain, alcohol consumption, diabetes, insulin resistance, pregnancy, mal- nourishment, some drugs like steriods, high cholesterol and/or triglycerides, and others.

    If the doctor can tell which of these causes is why you have this...he may recommend not drinking alcohol, losing weight, changing the drugs you are taking, etc. In these particular cases...stopping the cause is the best solution.

    When the liver develops fat inside...the fat causes pressure on the liver cells to the point it can even push the nucleus of the cell out of place. That is why it is important to follow what the doctor says to prevent this. Simple fatty liver can be reversed and even slight damage to the liver cells can then heal.

    You show that the liver is normal size. This is also good.

    When the cells of the liver become damaged, the immune system of our bodies respond to this damage and causes inflammation to develop inside the liver. This will cause the liver to enlarge in size. This is bad...cause now it changes from Simple fatty liver disease to Steatohepatitis. Steato means fat, hepat means liver, and itis means inflammation. Unless the patient truly is determined then to stop the cause and have the inflammation treated....it can progress to where the liver cells start to die off and form scar tissue inside the liver that blocks the flow of blood through the liver on its way back to the heart and also blocks the flow of blood to the other liver cells, so they continue to die off. This is then an irreversible disease known as Cirrhosis of the liver.

    Everything in your tests results, for now, shows to be normal except for the fact you have simple fatty liver.

    If you think of the liver being surrounded by a membrane capsule...you can imagine, in your mind, how much pressure would develop in the liver by the fat and inflammation being there, that would actually cause the liver to enlarge in size.

    I will also state, that even thin people can develop a fatty liver.

    I'm going to give you a few links to look at...you just have to click

    on them:

    http://www.aafp.org/afp/20060601/1961.html

    http://yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/fatty-liver.ht...

    http://www.gastro.com/Gastro/liverdisease/fatty_li...

    http://www.medicinenet.com/fatty_liver/article.htm

    I hope this information is of some help to you. Best wishes

    Source(s): caregiver to a liver transplant patient
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  • 1 decade ago

    You need to go to a GI doctor to find the cause of your fatty liver. There are allot of causes and generally these specialists will first do a generalized physical with blood work to check your liver enzymes and also order a DNA test t see why you have this conditon. Most often this is always secondary to a primary condition that has effected the liver for some reason. Have you ever been tested for things like the different types of Hepatitis types there are? This might be one primary cause.but I really have not heard of diabetes ever doing it. The good news is that a fatty liver is not a really bad news for you as the good news is that whatever the cause it was caught while you can help it get back to normal. The report as a whole is good with this one exception. The liver is the only organ that can rejuvenate itself too. After the GI doctor finds the cause they will help you get back to normal again at this point. Good luck and God Bless

    Source(s): nursing experience BTW- You'll need allot of patience waiting for the results of the DNA report. This will take several weeks for the lab to nail down the cause.
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  • ?
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Fatty Liver Size

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  • Debra
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Fatty liver disease affects a whopping 30% of the population. That's 30 out of every 100 people! And some estimates have it at 33%.

    And if you're overweight, it's even worse overweight people are extremely more likely than healthy weight individuals to develop this condition.

    In other words, you're not alone. Not by a long shot.

    Other fatty liver sufferers have reversed their condition, lost weight, and rediscovered their energy, using completely natural remedies. And that means you can, too!

    Keep reading to discover more...

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Risk of fatty liver - need some clarification?

    I undergone for ultrasound (abdomen) for some other reason... but i got following report regarding my liver ...

    Normal in size with diffuse increase in echotexture.

    No focal altration in echotexture.

    Intrahepatic biliary radicles appear normal

    Common duct messures normal ...

    Impression :...

    Source(s): risk fatty liver clarification: https://tr.im/A8uMH
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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    The risk for developing liver disease varies, depending on the underlying cause and the particular condition. General risk factors for liver disease include alcoholism, exposure to industrial toxins, heredity (genetics), and long-term use of certain medications.

    The following factors increase the risk for viral hepatitis:

    Hepatitis A (HAV)

    Hepatitis B (HBV)

    Hepatitis C (HCV)

    Treatment for liver disease varies, depending on the underlying cause and how far the disease has progressed. When diagnosed early, some forms of liver disease can be treated with lifestyle changes. For example, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can be reversed by weight loss through exercise and healthy diet, by controlling blood sugar and cholesterol levels, and by avoiding toxic substances

    You can know more other ways to treat fatty liver, such as suitable diet, natural measures .you can refer to here to understand more:http://adola.net/go/fattyliver-bible/

    Hope this useful!

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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  • 3 years ago

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  • 3 years ago

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  • 3 years ago

    take in drinking water with out sophisticated carbs

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