In Hinduism : Who is Goddess Tripurasundari?

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1. Why is the Goddess known by that name and what does the term 'Tripura Sundari' mean?

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago
    Best answer

    Maa Tripurasundari is one of the Dasa maha Vidyas. The name Mahavidyas comes from the Sanskrit roots, with maha meaning 'great' and vidya meaning, 'revelation, manifestation, knowledge, or wisdom. Shaktas believe, "the one Truth is sensed in ten different facets; the Divine Mother is adored and approached as ten cosmic personalities," the Dasa-Mahavidya ("ten-Mahavidyas"). Tripurasundari (Shodashi): The Goddess Who is "Beautiful in the Three Worlds" (Supreme Deity of Srikula systems); the "Tantric Parvati" or the "Moksha Mukuta". Tripurasundari is the power of consciousness, Cit-shakti. She is the awareness of the Supreme Self, Paramatman, as one with the supreme Reality or Absolute, Parabrahman. As true knowledge she is called Samvit, which is the power to comprehend all things as consciousness itself.

    Sinduraruna vigraham trinayanam manikyamauli sphurat

    Tara nayaka shekharam smitamukhim apina vakshoruham |

    Panibhyam alipoorna ratna chashakam raktotpalam bibhratim

    Saumyam ratna ghatastha raktacharanam dhyayet paramambikam||

    The Divine mother is to be meditated upon as shining in a vermilion-red body, with three eyes, sporting a crown of rubies studded with the crescent moon, a face all smiles, a splendid bust, one hand holding a jewel-cup brimming with mead, and the other twirling a red lotus.

    Here Maa Tripurasundari, one of the Dasa maha vidyas having ''trinayanam'' Who has the three graceful eyes, and bless us. As Shodashi, Tripurasundari is represented as a sixteen-year-old girl, and is believed to embody sixteen types of desire. Shodashi also refers to the sixteen syllable mantra, which consists of the fifteen syllable (panchadasakshari) mantra plus a final seed syllable. The Shodashi Tantra refers to Shodashi as the "Beauty of the Three Cities," or Tripurasundari.

    Tripura commonly refers to the triple form of the goddess as found in the triadic doctrine of Shaktism. According to Bhaskararaya's commentary of the Tripura Upaniṣad:

    There are three forms of deity: physical (sthūla), subtle (sūkṣma) and supreme (parã).

    Mantra, Yantra and Tantra are the three aspects of Śrī Vidyā. Mantra implies holy chanting, while Yantra is a symbolic representation of Mantra. Tantra comprises mental concentration and focusing, rituals and kundalini yoga. One thousand names for this form of Devī are recited in the Lalitā Sahasranāma, which includes Śrī Vidyā concepts.

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  • SHIVA
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    Goddess Tripura Sundari is an integral part of the religious life of Tripura.

    Tripura Sundari of Tripura is also refereed to as Shodashi, Rajarajeshvari or Lalita. She is actually one of the ten goddesses associated with the Hindu religion who are together called the mahavidyas.

    This goddess is described as being the mate of lord Shiva. It is commonly believed that the state of Tripura has derived its name from Tripura Sundari. One of the major temples of the satte is dedicated to the worship of Tripura Sundari.

    The importance of Goddess Tripura Sundari in Tripura can be understood from the fact that it is considered one of the 51 pithasthanas associated with the religion of Hinduism.

    Goddess Tripura Sundari is often referred to as Shodasi. Shodasi is commonly reperesented in the state as a girl of sixteen years. She represents sixteen different types of urges.

    The Shodasi Tantra is an important source of information about Tripura Sundari in Tripura. According to this source, Tripura Sundari is actually the illumination in the eyes of Lord Shiva.

  • kennie
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Tripura Sundari Mantra

  • 9 years ago

    tripura is the adobe of goddess Sri lalitha parameshwari, aka sri lalitha tripuasundari

    since sri laitha is sundari and her adobe is tripura thus the name Sri lalitha tripura sundari,

    Tripura is the ultimate, primordial Shakti, the light of manifestation. She, the pile of letters of the alphabet, gave birth to the three worlds. At dissolution, She is the abode of all tattvas, still remaining Herself - Vamakeshvaratantra

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  • 9 years ago

    Tripurasundarĩ ("Beautiful (Goddess) of the Three Cities") or Mahã-Tripurasundarĩ ("Great Beautiful (Goddess) of the Three Cities"), also called Śoḍaṣĩ ("Sixteen"), Lalitã ("She Who Plays") and Rãjarãjeśvarĩ ("Queen of Queens, Supreme Ruler"), is one of the group of ten goddesses of Hindu belief, collectively called Mahavidyas.

    As Shodashi, Tripurasundari is represented as a sixteen-year-old girl, and is believed to embody sixteen types of desire. Shodashi also refers to the sixteen syllable mantra, which consists of the fifteen syllable (panchadasakshari) mantra plus a final seed syllable. The Shodashi Tantra refers to Shodashi as the "Beauty of the Three Cities," or Tripurasundari.

    Tripurasundari is the primary goddess associated with the Shakta Tantric tradition known as Sri Vidya.

    'Tripura' means 'the three cities,' and 'sundarĩ' means 'beautiful,' specifically a beautiful female.

  • Tripurasundarĩ ("Beautiful (Goddess) of the Three Cities") or Mahã-Tripurasundarĩ ("Great Beautiful (Goddess) of the Three Cities"), also called Śoḍaṣĩ ("Sixteen"), Lalitã ("She Who Plays"[1]) and Rãjarãjeśvarĩ ("Queen of Queens, Supreme Ruler"), is one of the group of ten goddesses of Hindu belief, collectively called Mahavidyas.

    As Shodashi, Tripurasundari is represented as a sixteen-year-old girl, and is believed to embody sixteen types of desire. Shodashi also refers to the sixteen syllable mantra, which consists of the fifteen syllable (panchadasakshari) mantra plus a final seed syllable. The Shodashi Tantra refers to Shodashi as the "Beauty of the Three Cities," or Tripurasundari.[2]

    Tripurasundari is the primary goddess associated with the Shakta Tantric tradition known as Sri Vidya

    Tripurasundari is described as being of dusky, red, or golden in color, depending on the meditational form, and in sexual union with Shiva. The couple are traditionally portrayed on a bed, a throne, or a pedestal that is upheld by Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, and Indra. She holds five arrows or flowers, a noose, a goad and a sugarcane or bow. The noose represents attachment, the goad represents repulsion, the sugarcane bow represents the mind and the arrows are the five sense objects.

    Bala Tripurasundari is another form of Tripurasundari that is pictured either as an independent young goddess who is 16 years of age, or as an unmarried, pre-menarche girl of nine or ten years of age, also known as a kumari. Bala Tripurasundari's mantra differs slightly from that of Maha Tripurasundari.

    Tripurasundari is also worshipped as the Sri Yantra, which is considered by practitioners of Sri Vidya to be a more true representation of the goddess.

    Tripurasundari combines in her being Kali's determination and Durga’s charm, grace, and complexion. She has a third eye on her forehead. Usually four-armed and clad in red, the richly bejeweled Tripurasundari sits on a lotus seat laid on a golden throne. She carries in her hands various attributes associated with Shiva. An aura of royalty characterizes her overall bearing and ambiance.

    Source(s): wiki
  • 9 years ago

    Tripurasundari ("Beautiful Goddess of the Three Cities") or Maha-Tripurasundari ("Great Beautiful Goddess of the Three Cities"), is one of the group of ten goddesses of Hindu belief, collectively called Mahavidyas.

    As Shodashi, Tripurasundari is represented as a sixteen-year-old girl, and is believed to embody sixteen types of desire.

    'Tripura' means 'the three cities,' and 'sundarĩ' means 'beautiful,' specifically a beautiful female. Therefore, her name means 'Beautiful Goddess of the Three Cities'. Tripura is often popularly translated as 'the three worlds; She is a form of Goddess Parvati also..........................................................

  • 9 years ago

    Tripura Sundari, also called Shodashi, Lalita (lit. "She Who Plays") and Rajarajeshvari, is one of the group of ten goddesses of Hindu belief, collectively called Mahavidyas. The other nine mahavidyas are Kali, Tara, Bhuvaneswari, Bhairavi, Chhinnamasta, Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, Matangi, and Kamalatmika.

    “Tripura” means 'the three worlds’ (Svarloka, Bhuloka, and Patala). “Sundari” means 'most attractive' or 'most beautiful'. Therefore, her name means 'The Most Beautiful Girl in the Three Worlds'. A more esoteric interpretation is that she is called Tripuraa (meaning, 'The Three Ancients', rather than Tripura, 'The Three Worlds') because her body is said to be made up of the collective Shaktis of Brahma, Vishnu, and Rudra (Brahmani, Vaishnavi, and Rudrani, respectively).

    The word 'Shodashi' literally means sixteen in Sanskrit. The goddess Tripura Sundari in her aspect as Shodasi is represented as a sixteen-year-old girl, and is believed to embody sixteen types of desire. In human life sixteen years represent the age of accomplished perfection after which decline sets in. This girl of sixteen rules over all that is perfect, complete, beautiful. The Shodasi Tantra, a treatise on the Tantra, describes Tripura Sundari as "the radiant light in the eyes of Shiva".

    Tripura Sundari is described in great detail as extremely attractive, beautiful, and erotically inclined. She is described as being of dusky color, and is depicted in an intimate position with an aspect of Shiva. The couples are shown on a bed, a throne, or a pedestal resting on the significant male gods of Hinduism like Brahma, Vishnu, Rudra, and Indra. Lalita holds five flowery arrows, noose, goad and bow.

    Appearance - Symbols

    The noose represents attachment.

    The goad represents repulsion.

    The sugarcane bow represents the mind.

    The flowery arrows are the five sense objects.

    Source(s): Jai chamunda mata -indianfestials.com
  • 4 years ago

    Hi, My dear friend in Hinduism we praise as it is written that in this Kaliyug praise is the best way to appease God/Goddess. Now as per praising of Goddess in Lalitha Sahasra Namam I would say that if you have even a little of lust in your mind then praising to any Goddess will bring out such things in mind. Now if you see the same concept through the eyes of lust free then everything makes sense.... Secondly in Hinduism we try to visualize the Goddess in a form and to describe the way it is in done in Lalitha Sahasra Namam it helps us to visualize HER in order to manifest HER in our minds... Thirdly why are you looking at it as body parts, these are symbols, in order to know the real meaning what it means we have to go beyond this lateral thinking and devise it as symbols which tell us the attributes of that particular deity. Hope it helps....

  • ?
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    Wife of Lord Shiva and Beautiful goddess of three world!

  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/aylY5

    I don't abhor the question since a valid point seems to have been raised. Judging the past from the present standards, norms and etiquettes, which are man-made and not uniform in all societies may not be a proper method of analysis. The context of spiritual quest, cultural moorings and evolution of literature and a host of other principles are needed to understand properly. Worship of the Divine, in the form of Mother Goddess is an ad-continuum in Hindu society, while the ancient Sumerian and Greek traditions of similar nature are lost in time under the influence of alien religious schools of thought. The Vedic concept of Brahman, the Absolute, in formless worship, got evolved into worship in forms, thus the Hindu Trinity, consorts and even a family. Emphasis of one or the other aspect, as prime form of worship, gave rise to theological schools, which were codified and standardised by Adi Shankaracharya in six basic mode, with several other deity forms getting sub-classification under these six. While Shakta-Dharma remained the principal theism in Eastern States, the worship of Mother Goddess is widely prevalent in all parts of the country, with several subsidiary and village deities. The Lalita Sahasra Nama Stotram, the Lalita Trishati and the Lalita Ashottara Shata Namavali, are the three principal sacred chants for 'archana', of the Goddess in benign form of Lalita, Rajarajeshwari, Tripurasundari etc. The Anga-Pooja, of various deities, also has a standard of worshipping each part of the form, and widely prevalent especially for Vinayaka Chaturthi, Varamahalakshmi, Saraswati pooja. The literary tradition of praise of deity as Paadaadi keshaanta and Keshaadi Paadaanta, (Toe to head and converse) is present for all deities whether as male or female form. The underlying principle of Prakriti and Purusha, in worship of a sole Absolute is thebasis. Hindu theistic schools do have a postulate of the individual soul being part of the Universal Soul, and do not visualise as having separation of time and space, though the concept of 'moksha' (loosely translatable as 'liberation') has differences in nuances and emphasis in various philosophical schools. As 'ansh' of the 'anshi' (part of the Whole), the conceptualisation is investment of holiness and sanctity in human endeavour in conformity with the ultimate authority of the Vedas. A person can not be a wholesome one if any part is severable as waste or redundant. Thus every part of the human body is considered as an essential component of the whole. The same concept is transposed in worship to the form of the deity too. The object is to realise the holiness of the segments forming the whole and not the approach isintegral. The ****** sculptures found in temples have also an underlying object of motivating one to transcend the mundane and seek the Divine. I do not find any redundancy or impropriety in descriptions as found in Soundarya Lahari and the Lalita Triology. Kalidasa's Kumara Sambhavam too contains passages in describing Uma in penance, which, shorn out of context and analysed as just poetry would lead one to wrong conclusions. The description of breasts as an ****** factor is on account of influence of alien culture for a few centuries a nd not in conformity with the Indian tradition of yore. Jayadeva's Geeta Govindam, Arunagirinathar's Tiruppugazh, Tirujnana Sambhar's Tevaram, et al had no inhibition of the word 'breast' symbolising the sustaining and nourishing aspect of the Goddess. The word "mulai" in Tamil and 'stanam' in Sanskrit adopted as 'stan'/than in Hindi have undergone the sinister onslaught of alien influence and hardly present day writers use them. That the two parts of the One, in male and female forms, as Parvati-Parameshwara, Lakshmi-Narayana and Saraswati-Brahma, are always in unison, has been stressed in devotional literature. In Lalita Ashtottara Shatanamavali, it is not only 'Bhootesha aalingana udbhoota pulakaangyai namo namaH' but also "Mahadeva samaayukta Mahaadevyai amo namaH". The first verse of Kanakadhara Stavam is "Angam HareH pulaka bhooshaNam aashrayanti" In Venkatesha Mangalashashanam, one finds "Ramayaa ramamaaNaaya Venkateshaaya Mangalam". These can not be construed as the deities indulgent in physical gratification but as presentation of the ideal of oneness of the man and consort. In Tiruvachakam, there is a verse in the form of conversation between two damsels: "The Lord of Dance facing South is mad after his woman; (alluding to Shiva Parvati as 'anyonyaashlishta') Ans: If He isn't so, all the organisms in all worlds would turn ascetics and continuity in creation would get stalled" (free literal translation of 'thenpaal uhandu aadum' verse). Viewed in the above angle, one would be able to appreciate the beauty and concept of the descriptions quoted in the question.

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