trying to make a fireplace heat exchanger and I looking to use black pipe?

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  • 4 years ago
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    Anyone who has studied the various components that make up the overall heat transfer coefficients for a pipe heat exchanger knows that the conductivity of the pipe is a very minor consideration. It is the other components such as the film coefficients that actually govern the heat transfer rate.

    With that in mind, corrosion is a big consideration in a fireplace exchanger. For that reason the cheapest stainless steel you can find would be the best choice. If you are not looking for a long life for the exchanger black pipe will work. You might even consider thin wall conduit or structural tubing. Exhaust pipes from a junk yard would be another thing to look at.

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  • 4 years ago

    pipe as its very thickest and least expensive that can be easily found retail these things simply heat the pipe from the fire while air runs inside the pipe from and to your living space any advice on how the best way to put this together is i have a blower and that is more then big enough more or less needing a manafold were all the the pipes get their air from

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  • 4 years ago

    I seriously doubt that rick's suggestion of stainless steel exhaust pipe is a good choice for being cheaper, but it is certainly bigger and thinner.

    Black iron will work better for water than air and it is not very conductive and is heavy and costly for larger sizes.

    If not in the fire, copper is much more conductive.

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  • 4 years ago

    Find a shop that bends tube and have a five or six bent in the same "C" shape. Then assemble them so that they are under what holds the logs and form a cradle for the logs. Something like this:

    http://www.woodlanddirect.com/Fireplace-Heater-for...

    Fan is optional and there might be a site that has details for the do it yourself types some place.

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  • 4 years ago

    see http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_he...

    I do warn you that you have to consider differences in thermal expansion so whatever you make does not break as it heats/cools, or worse, break your stove while it is burning !

    Also you will need to keep it sealed so exhaust does not escape.

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