?
Lv 6
? asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 1 year ago

Can I obstruct justice if I impede an investigation into an alleged crime which I didn't commit?

The law says yes, so why do Trump supporters deny it?

6 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    So by your definition every single police officer, district attorney, ADA and judge is guilty of obstruction...gee that makes sense

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  • Katz22
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Yes, interfering with an investigation is obstruction of justice.

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  • 1 year ago

    Barr, or sources close to him, have said that it cannot. I'd encourage them to look at Rachel Maddow's allegory of a police officer catching a criminal and the main character tripping the officer up- this, according to the thinking of the decision, is not illegal, but they're only still within the law if the officer eventually catches the criminal.

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  • 1 year ago

    There is evidence all over the place that Donald Trump has committed multiple crimes and that the lifts-wearing (5'10" pretending to be tall) conman Trump remains on a course of criminality as well as ongoing obstructions of justice. If one reads the Mueller report in its entirety, then the four-page "summary" provided by the latest Trump "toady" (yes-man) Attorney General (in name only) William Barr is woefully misleading as to the contents of the two-volume detailed report. As stated by Robert Mueller, Trump is neither exonerated nor accused, and the reason given for not accusing is that Mueller felt this was a job for Congress. Mueller thought it would be unfair to accuse a target of an investigation of criminality if that person was not interviewed by the investigators and given a chance to offer a defense, or words to this effect. He left the case open and put it into Congress's hands.

    The ongoing Trump refusal to release his telltale tax returns is obstruction of justice.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Even if it happens that the crime being investigated never took place, that the whole thing was a misunderstanding or a hoax, if you've sought to impede or undermine the official investigation into the matter then you're guilty of obstructing justice.

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  • 1 year ago

    Perhaps. One could say that just because I am convinced I didn't commit a crime doesn't mean that's the case. Of course, if I didn't think I committed a crime, then why would there be any action on my part where that could be construed as my motivation? Isn't intent important?

    • ?
      Lv 6
      1 year agoReport

      I may fear that other dirty dealings of mine may become known to the general public.

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