As a teenager in Nazi Germany, would you have been able to resist the power and attraction of he Nazi?

Like would you feel pressured to? Or would you be able to resist the Nazis? Because I know there was a lot of propaganda and pressure etc

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  • Fred
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Best answer

    Generally teenagers are the easiest to convince. Hitler used the Hitler youth movement to give the teenagers of Germany exciting and fun experiences while giving them propaganda making them feel Germans were superior people and in fact were training them to be future soldiers for his plans to conquer all Europe. Boys got the chance to fire military weapons, fly gliders, take part in huge ceremonies with lots of colourful flags and men in impressive uniforms. Back then the teenagers found it exciting and did not realise that they were actually being put through a sort of military training and indoctrination into the ways of Nazism. The Hitler Youth gave them pride in their country and taught them the need to be willing to protect it and in the last few months of the war when the boys of the Hitler Youth were used as soldiers defending Germany from the Russian invaders some off the toughest soldiers were the teenagers as they still believed the propaganda and Hitler Youth indoctrination that they were so superior to any other peoples that Germany was still winning the war, whereas the adult soldiers knew the war was lost and were losing the will to fight on.

    Few teenagers resisted the Hitler Youth and found it exciting to be a part of Germany's rebirth into a strong and powerful nation.

  • 6 months ago

    You would be pressured To Join Either Das Deutsche Mädel Or The Hitler Youth, And if you did not there would be a high chance of Death Or Work Camp.

  • 6 months ago

    None of us can say what we would be like in a different environment. We all tend to be who we are because we were who we were. All are shaped by our experiences. My wife's Onkel Gunter, born in Magdeburg in 1917, turned 16 the year the Nazis took power. He was an ardent Nazi until wounded on the East Front & captured by the Soviets in 1943. He was quickly turned to an ardent Bolshevik. On the day my wife was born, he published his first copy of "Rote Morgen (Red Morning)", a pro-communist newspaper to be distributed among other P.O.W.'s. Post-war, he was a member of the K.P.D.D.R. (Communist Party of the German Democratic Republic). He was the deputy mayor of Magdeburg for many years.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Nope. I'd have applied to join the Waffen SS. Probably would have made it in too!

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  • y
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Nope, people that believe they will do this or that differently then those who were in the situation did, are kidding themselves. Sick crap but if it is the only crap one knows, one goes along. We see it today in Afghanistan in many places. Women have no rights, are treated like crap, Blah, blah, blah. Yet many of them fight those who are fighting for them, so that they can have an education, have some sort of rights and crap.

  • 6 months ago

    Say what you want about Hitler but he was one of the most persuasive speakers who ever lived. He managed to convince nice moral church going Christians to do systematically kill anyone he did not like. Very few kids were able to resist him, specially when their parents thought he was like God.

  • 6 months ago

    Most of the propaganda came from the West - and it was directed at their own people.

    Teenagers didn't want to resist anything - and there was no "indoctrination" involved. When you have lived most of your life in a state of oppression and someone comes along and pulls you out of poverty and gives you a better future, you don't want to resist him.

    Hitler never indoctrinated anyone - those people who followed and admired him did so because they experienced the worst of the worst for themselves. They were part of the collapse of the economic system caused by the irresponsible Weimar Republic, and they went through the Great Depression - at least the first two years of it. When Hitler was elected Chancellor, he turned everything around and gave his people purpose and the kind of life they'd been denied for 14 years.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Teenagers are amongst the easiest to radicalise.

    In the early 1930s before their assumption of power it might have depended on where you lived – Munich, for example, was particularly Nazi-friendly, Hamburg and Berlin distinctly not.

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 6
      6 months agoReport

      Significant that Munich, & Bavaria overall, even today have mostly Catholic populations whereas Hamburg & Berlin are predominantly Lutheran.

  • 6 months ago

    Probably not...as a teenager, all we have known is that which we have grown up around.

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