Just curious, but why is most home not going solar?

13 Answers

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  • Bob
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    I would install solar panels in my home in the UK if it could be done without all of the BS required by the power companies. They will not allow 'nett metering' and require that the system is installed by a registered company, all of this pushes up the cost.

  • 5 months ago

    In locations where solar would pay back well, the grid is already saturated with it. In Honolulu, they stopped allowing new installations for a while, at a time when people were clamoring for it. We have quite a bit of solar in my neighborhood in California - not surprising, considering that our rate for peak power is 45 cents per kWh.

    In locations where power is cheap (right next to a coal plant or something), or where there isn't much sun, solar takes a long time to pay for itself, if ever. Payback time is around 5 years where I live, after which it's free electricity.

    Source(s): We've had solar electric since 2006 http://pididu.com/solar/photovoltaic.html
  • 5 months ago

    The problem lies mostly in the storage system, the batteries and inverter. That's where the real money goes.

  • 5 months ago

    Not only is the cost too high but the panels have a finite life and you have to buy another set and if you have battery storage they also have a finite life.

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  • qrk
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    If you have a system that doesn't store energy, you are still reliant on the power grid when the panels can't get enough light. This causes big headaches for power generation plants.

    If you get a system with battery backup, that's a pretty big investment that takes about 15 to 20 years to reap monetary benefits (paper napkin arithmetic after talking the the Tesla rep at an Earth Day festival in California). Then there's maintenance which are additional costs. Then there's the impact of Lithium mining for the batteries which has social and political ramifications. Perhaps we'll have better storage systems in the future (kinetic comes to mind), but the present route is lithium batteries.

  • 5 months ago

    TOO EXPENSIVE TO INSTALL SUCH SYSTEM AND REQUIRES MAINTENANCE MONTHLY , WHOLE SOLAR SYSTEM BECOMES WEAKER AND WEAKER ( PRODUCE LESS POWER ) STARTING AFTER 2 YEARS OR LESS ( HAPPEN VERY OFTEN TO VERY CHEAP MADE SOLAR PANEL AND BATTERY BANKS FROM CHINA MADE ) . EVEN THE EXPENSIVE AND GOOD QUALITY SYSTEM REQUIRES TO BE REPLACED AFTER 5 YEARS.

  • 5 months ago

    Solar is unreliable and areas having low solar insolation, cloud or forest cover of tropics or equator, long nights of winter at high latitudes are not suited for solar energy. Land area is also a constraint and floating solar panels have to be installed over big water bodies like lakes and rivers or the sea in areas having high annual solar insolation to cut down on evaporative loss of water and save water for summer, area having no cloud nor forest covers and areas having long days or at least equal duration day like in tropical climates. Desert regions of Mohave, Thar, Arabian desert, desert nations of South America can use concentrated solar power plants.

    Daily solar insolation can vary from season to season, from coastline to interiors, from equator to higher latitudes, from sea-level to high altitudes.

    In many tropical and equatorial regions, there is cloud cover and cover of tall green forests prevent exposure of sun to the ground..

    In residential and office buildings or high-rise towers, solar panels have to be installed on water tanks located on the terrace.

  • 5 months ago

    Too expensive up front. Uncertainty about the reliability of the system, mainly the panels.

    Very questionable investment decision. Taking into account depreciation, loss of earnings on the capital cost, the meagre cost of electricity anyway (most of the bill is a standing service fee), and distrust of the offered feedin tarriff, I cannot make the numbers work in favour of solar panels.

    The saturation marketing of these things smells to high heaven like a scam.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    For me, cost.

    I pay an average of $70 a month for electricity or about $840 a year.

    A home solar system in the 5 kW to 7 kW seems to be about $30k. Even with a 1/3 Federal tax credit, $20k for me doesn't make sense at what electricity costs me. I do live in a place with relatively inexpensive electricity. In another state (and one with more sun than where I am), that could change.

    Interesting we were just in Belize. 17 deg about North of the equator, sun pretty much all year around. Didn't see a single solar panel installation. Didn't see any solar hot water heating systems (in contrast, when we were in Turkey years ago, pretty much every house in the interior had solar water heating systems).

    Poor math? I know I've argued with people who say they save $1,000 a year on a $20,000 system and therefore they are making 5% on their money. Wrong. It takes 20 years just to recoup your initial investment, you haven't made a dime at that point.

    You give me $20,000 and I'll pay you back $1,000 a year and hey, you are making 5%. Try beating that at a bank.

    • I have repeatedly done similar math and it NEVER works out in favour of solar. Just think $30K for the setup. How long does the guarantee last? If you have to toss the lot after 10 years (because it has failed, or a better system is released) , then you are throwing away $3K/year to save $1K. Nuts?

  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Depends on where you live. Where I live, every home on my street has Solar Power.

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