Does "She was charged with fraud" mean it has been decided so in the court of law?

Hello.

I am not a native English speaker and I'd like to ask you a question about the exact meaning of the following sentence.

"She was charged with credit card fraud"

Does this mean an accusation was made against her in the stage before the final sentence in the court of law, or it has been decided true and guilty so she has already been sentenced to a punishment?

I am not sure if that is a final truth or merely an accusation by others that happened prior to final examination.

Thank you for reading.

14 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    In the Criminal Justice System you cannot be tried for a crime unless you are formally charged. A criminal charge is a formal accusation made by a governmental authority (usually a public prosecutor or the police) asserting that somebody has committed a crime.If charged you will be given a charge sheet and depending on the severity of the alleged crime you may be allowed home or detained. Eventually the case may go to court and, in Britain, the assertion is that you are innocent until proved guilty.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Being charged does not mean guilty. Only a trial can decide guilty or not guilty. Many people are charged with offenses which might, eventually be thrown out.

    Being charged comes first. Being found guilty or not guilty comes at the end of the trial.

  • 5 months ago

    It is not the final ruling of the court. It means she has been accused of doing that.

    But it is a serious charge, because the police would not charge her unless they

    had very good reason to think that it was true.

    • John P
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      It means that she was brought in front of a judge (and jury) in a court in the charge of fraud. Only the facts revealed in the trial by any witnesses called by the prosecution and defence could then be taken into account by the jury in deciding whether she was guilty or not guilty.

  • 5 months ago

    Charged is being accused and arrested for something. Convicted is when a judge declared one guilty of the charge

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  • 5 months ago

    charge means formal accusation (legal statement of the crime that you are being accused of; the police are claiming that you did a crime). You have to be charged before you can be put before a court. A charge is not the same as guilt. Loads of people are charged with crimes, all the time, but are not found guilty of those crimes. Innocent until proven guilty, after all. I have been charged with a crime but had the charges dismissed because the charge was determined (in court) to be unfounded. A claim of wrongdoing does not mean that you did a wrong thing. Claims are often wrong themselves. There are many possible reasons that the police or whoever is making the charge has misinterpreted reality. Usually, the problem is one of only seeing part of the event.

  • 5 months ago

    It means being officially accused by the police of committing the crime. In UK, that indicates the Crown Prosecution Service believes that there is enough evidence to warrant a court trial taking place. Being charged puts you on warning that a court case will take place with you as the accused of the crime.

  • 5 months ago

    The charge, a formal accusation, comes first. Then evidence of guilt is presented and the person charged gets to present their defense against the charge. Then a decision of guilty or not guilty. If found guilty, then the sentencing.

    In US law, the prosecution must prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. The person being accused does not have to prove their innocence, they must only raise enough doubt in the mind of the jury or judge.

    • Donghyeon5 months agoReport

      Thank you for the answer and sharing your insight into the American court system. :) I appreciate it.

  • 5 months ago

    In this case, "charged" means "officially accused".

    "She was charged with fraud" means the authorities or police have found enough evidence to "officially accuse" her of fraud. People in the US can't be arrested and held without being "charged" or officially accused of a crime. This is just the first step. Until she goes through a trial and is found guilty by a judge, she is legally presumed to be innocent. The authorities made the accusation, but they must prove it before she is found guilty or "convicted".

    • Donghyeon5 months agoReport

      Thank you for the neat answer. It certainly clears up my confusion. Have a good day.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    It is the first stage of a prosecution. The court appearance follows where the accused may plead innocent or guilty.

    • Donghyeon5 months agoReport

      Thank you for the concise answer. Have a good day.

  • 5 months ago

    just an accusation, if she had been found guilty, they would say she had been convicted of fraud

    • Donghyeon5 months agoReport

      Thank you for your answer which is helpful. :) I wish you a good day.

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