Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 9 months ago

Back in the 1300s, did anyone survive the black plague?

Or without modern medical science, was it a case where once you had it, you were doomed to die from it?

22 Answers

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  • 8 months ago

    No. All of humanity was wiped out. The entire Earth was populated only by animals. Those animals used the DNA from dead people to recreate the human species, a la "Jurassic Park". That's why we're here to ask and answer silly questions today. Glad to be alive? Thank a duckbilled platypus.

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  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    It was the closest natural event to push humans to Extinction. World population at the time was around 400-500 million, the plague killed possibly as high as 200 million across the world in a short period of time.

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  • 8 months ago

    Yes, and it's speculated that the survivors passed, genetically, down their line a resistance to the HIV virus.

    https://www.the-scientist.com/research-round-up/co...

    However, remember that while Medieval times saw it as ONE disease, the plague was actually three types. One killed almost overnight, the other two took longer.

    Bubonic plague symptoms and signs include painful and enlarged or swollen lymph nodes (an enlarged lymph node due to plague is called a bubo), chills, headache, fever, and weakness.

    Septicemic plague (Black Death or black plague) symptoms and signs include fever, weakness, abdominal pain, chills, and shock. Tissue bleeding and death may cause the dying tissues to appear black.

    Pneumonic plague symptoms and signs include characteristic pneumonia symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, cough, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

    -------------------

    It's a frightening disease with a horrific history: It killed tens of millions in Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. Today, the only treatment are antibiotics, invented in the 20th century, and they have a success rate over 80%. But without intervention, the death rate is between 66% and 93%.Sep 14, 2015

    How they survived the plague, just barely - CNN - CNN.com

    https://www.cnn.com › 2015/09/11 › health › plague-survivors

    -------------------------

    • Lisa M
      Lv 4
      8 months agoReport

      What?! That's amazing!

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    I think you mean the plague normally called the "Black Death". In most parts of Europe and the British Isles about half of the population survived, possibly two thirds in some areas. That was in the pandemic of the mid 1300s.

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  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Back in the 1300"s did "ANYONE" survive the Black Plague ?

    many scholars believe the nursery rhyme

    RING around the ROSY

    was written about the SYMPTOMS of the Black plaque

    TODAY scientist KNOW the black plaque was caused by a BACILLUS YERSINA PESTIS that it travels from person to person Pneumonically ( air ) and BITES from FLEAS and rats

    additionally a FACT that so many SHEEP died the population survival was complicated by a FOOD and wool shortage

    people lived through the plague EVENT

    CLUE

    SURVIVORS ( dictionary ) person(s) remaining alive after an EVENT

    • Mark8 months agoReport

      Actually NO scholars believe the 'Ring around the Rosie' story, which was a blatant invention in the 1950s. And it is perfectly legit to describe people who get a dangerous illness but don't die of it (which is what OP was asking) as 'survivors'. Never heard of 'cancer survivors'?

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  • Athena
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Actually the plague only killed about a third of the population.

    Great yes, but hardly decimated.

  • 9 months ago

    Stop and think about this for a second. If nobody survived, the human race would be extinct.

    The Black Death was largely confined to Europe, and some parts of western Asia and the north of Africa.

    Estimates are that Europe lost 30% to 60% of its population. That is an enormous swing, which tells you that no one will ever really know. Accurate record-keeping didn't exist at the time.

    Estimates are also that it took 200 years for the world's population to recover to pre-plague levels.

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  • Nunya
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    I believe close to 3/4 of the population of Europe died to the plague. The people less affected tended to live in more rural places or had stronger immunities. The plague was basically a form of Eugenics where the people with weaker genes died off and the people with stronger genes were able to spread their DNA.

    • Lili
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      Not remotely that many.

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  • 9 months ago

    The Bubonic plague in 1346-53 had about an 80% mortality rate if you came down with symptoms.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    Due to the ability of the human body to heal itself there were many

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