Is Patient Transporter a good job?

UK.

You don't have to take care of them, you just need to transport them out of cars, ambulances etc.

I meet all their requirements apart from the High school diploma or GED part, I went to uni but I don't know what qualifications they're talking about. Hopefully this job has sufficient hours and i don't have to stand on my feet all day.

6 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes, all the jobs are good. It depends upon us how much effort we could make to be things done in the right way. There are not any jobs on the earth that are small or big. Even a blacksmith can be a Tata and shoe cobbler can be a Bata.

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  • 2 months ago

    I'm just presuming that a patient transporter is a VERY physical job with a lot of standing and/or walking.  

    One such UK job ad for "patient transport service crew" mentioned that the "role might be right for you if":

    - Full B-Class Driving License, held for a minimal of 2 years with a maximum of 3 live penalty points.

    - Qualified to British Red Cross Patient Transport crew level, or a recognized equivalent qualification.

    - Effective communication skills, written and oral.

    - Fitness to carry out the moving and handling of patients and equipment.

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    • jannsody
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Even helping to transport patients out of cars or ambulances will be a VERY physical job and require a lot of standing and being on one's feet :)

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  • 2 months ago

    High School Diploma and GED are US qualifications, so you must be looking at a job on a US website. In a UK context it's not even clear what job you are talking about: Maybe a patient transport driver, or an ambulance care assistant, or a hospital porter?

    The requirements for those two positions will be quite different.

    A porter will be on their feet a lot of the time. There will be no particular qualifications requirements, though I'm sure first aid qualifications would be a plus, and of course you would need to pass a DBS check. Most positions are full time.

    Ambulance Care Assistant or Patient Transport Driver might be full or part time.It wouldn't mean being on your feet nearly so much. There might be a first aid requirement unless they are expecting to provide that training. You obviously need a full clean UK driver's license, and probably to have held it at least three years. For some positions you may need a mini-bus license. Again, you would of course need to pass a DBS check. The pay is a bit higher than for a hospital porter.

    Either type of job can be expected to involve shift work and require you to be flexible with regards to hours.

    There's some more info that might help you here:

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/wid...

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/amb...

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  • Mmm J
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Define "good".

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  • Tavy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The U.K. websites I have seen do not mention GED or high school diplomas, we don't have them in the U.k. , they are American, so which websites are you looking at?

  • Sandy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I did that for about 6 months part time. it's very physical. lots of walking depending on how large the hospital is. you can sit if it's slow, but again, that depends on the size of the hospital.

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