Can I Be Claimed as Dependent on My Moms Tax Return?

I am currently a full time student at a university out of state. My scholarships pay for my tuition, I live in an apartment close to campus where I pay my own rent/utilities/etc. I also have two jobs in that state as well. However, I do come back home (home being my mom’s house) for winter and summer break and she pays for my health insurance and phone bill. 

That being said, can she claim me as a dependent or do I file my taxes as an independent?

Update:

edit: I also pay for my own car expenses, gas, and groceries

6 Answers

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  • 3 months ago

    Do you pay over half of your own support? If yes, you are not a dependent. If all she pays is insurance and phone bill, you pay more than half your own expenses and you are not dependent.

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  • 3 months ago

    Since you go back home for breaks, that is where you "live", and you are "temporarily absent" to attend school when you are in your apartment. (It doesn't go by where you spend more nights; a temporary absence for education or medical care counts as time at home.)

    However, since you are paying rent and utilities for the apartment and she pays only for health insurance and the phone bill, it is likely (although not definite) that you are paying more than half of your own "support" (food, clothing, education, housing, etc..), which would make you independent. If she is paying over half the total, then she can claim you as a dependent; if you are paying over half the total, then you file as independent.

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  • 3 months ago

    Indeed, as danxp2 says, the question is support.  However, I believe that you have to count her housing support for all year even though you are not there all year.  See the work sheet in IRS pub 501.

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    Based on your explanation.....NO.

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  • danxp2
    Lv 6
    3 months ago

    You meet all the other qualifying factors for sure to be a "qualifying child" as you are your mom's child, live with mom on the major breaks, you are not married, your mom and you both citizens, you are unde 24 and a full time student.

    The one factor in the air is support.  

    Support

    To meet this test, the child (you) cannot have provided more than half of his or her own support during the tax year. A person’s own funds are not support unless they are actually spent for support. 

    It becomes a breakdown of who paid what in dollar amounts. How much insurance/phone is compared to the car costs, food, rent, in actual dollar amounts.

    A quick, but not entirely accurate way to check is look at your wages and see if those are at least as much as your mom pays to support you, in insurance, phone, summer break housing, food etc. If you earn more then your parent pays your expenses, it is likely that you are not your mom's dependent. As you do seem to be using your wages to support yourself (not parked in a savings account earning interest, or invested in stocks/retirement account.) As the rule says funds don't necessarily mean support unless used to help pay for support.

    An enrolled agent would be helpful to answer this question if things are still murky. 

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    [*] Did the person (you) have gross income of less than $4,200 in 2019?

    [*] Did the parent provide more than half of your  total support for the year

    https://apps.irs.gov/app/vita/content/globalmedia/...

    You need to consult a Tax Expert if the above link to the IRS page does not help..

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    • NA
      Lv 7
      3 months agoReport

      I've seen cases of college students making $30,000 and still be a dependent. 

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