Would it be a wiser decision to start with coding before you jump into cyber security ? ?

I am making a career change and I was pretty much sold on joining a cyber security program that costs around 12K and its a 24 Week program. 

I told the lady I have literally 0 experience in this field and I’m just making a career change and that if I should take coding before I jump into cyber security because based off some YouTube videos everyone said Cyber security is pretty difficult, and coding seems to be a bit easier. 

The school had a cyber security and a coding program. I just want to know if you were in my shoes and you had 0 experience where would you start. 

Also if any of you are in this field and can kindly give me some advice I’d greatly appreciate it . 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.

    Source(s): Certified in cybersecurity
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  • 1 month ago

    I have been in I.T. in a company for about 13 years now. Not cyber-security specifically, more of a generalist.

    I think you will need to have programming knowledge and experience if you want to get into serious cyber security, and by "serious", I mean more than just locking down the unsafe parts of Windows 10 on some high school's network.

    Cyber security isn't really a starting point in an I.T. career, it's something that will take a while to get to. You should consider taking on an I.T. course first, with a focus on the areas that will be relevant. You will want to learn about using Linux, about TCP/IP and networking, and about scripting languages.

    And after that course, or possibly during, you will want to put that new knowledge to some use, and build scripts and programs with that code. If you're lucky you may be able to find some work where you can do that, but either way you will need to use it, and be a regular practitioner of this stuff. Build your own network, experiment. Code. I.T. is a field where you primarily learn by doing it, and when you stop doing it your skills go backward, because the technology is always going forward.

    I think that preparing for work in the area of cyber security is going to take a minimum of 5 years, assuming that you work really hard at it, fully throw yourself into I.T. and have a bit of luck with your opportunities.

    And of course, understanding that stuff is a moving target, a good 24 week course may have lots of useful info, but much of it could lose relevance in a year's time if you don't keep your life and your time focused on it. The learning never ends.

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