is there a way to wireless connect phone, or tablet, to TV without WiFi?

when I look online, everything says the phone/tablet and the TV have to be on the same WiFi to connect. My TV does not have WiFi, and even if it did, I would not want to connect it to the net.

4 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Well, the only way to wirelessly connect large devices is through WiFi, or Bluetooth. Bluetooth is not fast enough for video transmissions, so WiFi is it. If you extend the definition of "connection" to wired connections as well, then Ethernet opens up as a great wired alternative to WiFi. You can attach a Google Chromecast or Amazon Firestick or Anycast to the TV if your TV itself doesn't have these features.

    But what issue do you see as a problem for connecting your TV to the net? It's very unlikely that a TV can be hacked from afar, as there are too many different models available, and even if it could be hacked what are they going to do with it, change your channels?

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Get a wireless dongle for the TV. It's called "something-"cast (like Chromecast). It doesn't necessarily mean the TV connects to the internet. If your TV is old, it definitely won't. What the dongle does is just allow your computer, phone or tablet broadcast video to the TV. It's a one-way thing so no worries.

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  • VP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It's a common misconception that connecting a device to your home router (either via Ethernet cable or via Wi-Fi) means that your device is connected to the Internet.  Your router's 1st job is to allow your home devices to talk to each other or share resources if that's what you want to do.  It does this via the router's "switch function" that's built into it.  If you don't want to use the Internet -- then don't, but your laptop could still print wirelessly to your Wi-Fi-enabled printer if it needed to.

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  • y
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Cable, HDMI, I'm blanking on the other types, see if the laptop and the TV share one in common, they often do. There are also adopters and such to mix and match to make the right connections. Then you'll have to screw with settings, both on the TV and laptop. So take a peek at what you got and see if there is a combination that can work in your situation.

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