should communities start recycling old produce to make organic soil?

I have been interested in this topic for a while. The reason that I ask this question is because I believe that the climate change issue is mainly a pollution issue. I think that within 30 plus more years, there will have to be civilization changes. I believe that the first steps to make are to inform members of the community about the problems within our world. One of the many issues is obviously climate change. I think that communities are going to have to start coming up with some solutions for a healthier world, and I think that humans need to prepare for that new world. Planting is going to be a major thing for that new world order. In order to do that, people should start recycling rotten vegetables, fruit and vegetable peels, eggshells, etc. I think that people should start those drives in community centers. What do you think?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    a good idea---but big business needs to stop their polluting first and foremost. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Thanks for opening up your mind and showing all of us how vapid you are. 

    I see that you are proud of what you think, by your repeated 'I think'. But analyze how would this work in New York City? Nobody has a yard. Also, if not handled properly, compost would be a collection and breeding ground for rats, flies, and diseases. Just look at what happens when garbage men go on strike? The city becomes a disaster in just a few days. Do you think the average resident of NYC has the mental capacity to handle such matters in an intelligent way? These are the same people who elected AOC, Nadler, and Schumer as their leaders. Ha! Ha! 

    If I were you, I would think that out more thoroughly. 

    BTW, I am a big fan of compost. For example, I pour out our coffee grounds on the lawn and flower beds. This aids in the fertilization and keeps moles and grub worms in check. (And it works.) This is just an example. But if not done properly, it could create a bigger problem than what we have now. 

    But to legislate something like that is really asking for trouble. 

    • Elizabeth2 weeks agoReport

      The problem is thinking in the "asleep" box. The city life affects minds. People cannot see the city life another way except what has been accepted as successful. Look at the bigger picture -Pollution- then you can see that what was thought of as successful living- was creating unsuccessful results.

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  • 2 months ago

    Our R&D team has developed an appropriate technology. The output is disinfectant organic fertiliser whose market price is over $1000 per 1 ton. At such an approach we utilise the whole CO2, which is going to the organic waste that is converted to the fertiliser by anaerobic peculiar bacteria. Besides, a natural gas CH4 is produce as well. The best result is when we operate with organic waste that occupies 3000 to 5000 m^3. So, we are looking for investors...

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  • Mr. P
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Recycling is often driven at a city level because it costs them money to dispose of the city waste. If you get people to sort and recycle their own waste then there will be less to ultimately dispose of by the city and therefore is a cost saving for them - so they are promoting it.

    If they were serious about it they would promote composting by giving away the bins and allocating allotments so apartment dwellers can dig in their compost and grow their own food, but this is rarely the case.

    As I see it is is a push to save costs by reducing landfill with a greenwash to make compost. have you ever tried getting hold of this compost that you are freely donating into? It almost always gets used for city landscape projects to - you guessed it- save them money.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I have a backyard garden so it is something I normally do anyways.

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  • oikoσ
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Great idea in theory. Not as good in practice. You need a fair amount of space for composting to be effective. Apartment dwellers are pretty much limited to worm composting and producing about as much as they need for their potted plants. In rural areas, smart farmers have access to the raw materials and a use for the end product, so they do it themselves. Your idea would work in suburban areas except for the NIMBY factor.

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  • JimZ
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Plants take CO2 out of the atmosphere and use the sun's energy to form carbohydrates.  That is our food and when the food is processed that CO2 eventually returns to the atmosphere.  Essentially there is a net zero CO2 emission 

    • oikoσ
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      That's only from natural processes and "eventually" can be a very long time. Large trees can sequester CO2 for hundreds or even thousands of years.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Climax Chang is a Communism issue.

  • y
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I think the rapid rate that tree's are being cut down for farming, to feed those growing populations. Is just as much an issue as anything else. Those that are focusing on plant based as opposed to beef/animal based diets are only seeing the piece they wish to see. Our future is in farming insects and insect based diets.

  • Mark
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    That's what they did in the city I used to live in.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I looked into making my own compost. It turns out that it doesn’t work very well around here. Due to the cold winters, the pile would need to be at least 30 cubic feet, which is huge. About the size of a large house. A pile that big would require heavy machinery to turn it, which needs to be done regularly. 

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    • Coquihalla
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      I never turned it and in the spring I dug to the bottom to the dirt part of it and toss that additional soil into my garden 2'x4'x3(24 cubic feet)  That is the only time it got rotated.

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