Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 month ago

Which sentence is more correct in english?

I have a car.

I have got a car

I got a car.

Secondly, which word does the slang "gotta" replace, must or have to?

8 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    "I have a car." is more correct in English. If you would like to have the word "got" in that sentence, change it to "gotten" after "have": "I have gotten a car." The slang word "gotta" replaces "have got a/have got to".

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  • geezer
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It depends on what you're saying.

    I HAVE A CAR is a statement that means that you are the owner of a car

    I GOT A CAR means that you went out and bought one, probably recently

    I HAVE GOT A CAR  would be your answer to ''Do you have a car ?''

    and ...

    ''I GOTTA'' can mean ''I HAVE TO'', '' I MUST'', ''I'VE GOT TO''

    or even ''I HAVE A ..'' depending on the context.

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  • 1 month ago

        What do you want to convery?  If you want the reader to know you have a car, then you write:  'I have a car,'  If you just bought a car, and want that to be noted, as opposed to already owning a car, you would write specifically:  'I bought a car.'

    Regarding 'gotta'--it is slang for 'have got to.'   EX:  'I have got to study for my exam tomorrow.'   ( I gotta study for my exam...).

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  • 1 month ago

    got is generally replacing have, but it can also be used in its more traditional idea of obtain/receive/own, so you can say "I got a car" as a simple replacement of "I have a car" OR you can say "I've got a car" to mean the same thing but using the verb to get in its proper fashion.

    Strictly speaking, I got is the simple past form of the verb to get, but we use it colloquially exactly as the word have and as a present tense form to mean possess.

    That is, I've got a car is pretty much the same structure as I've run a mile.  But I got a car is the same as I run a mile.  I got when used that way is not "standard" English.

    EDIT.  I hope you see that I gotta=I have to (the word got is used to replace the word have).

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Any of the first three could be correct depending upon context and preference of the writer or speaker. Gotta means either must or have to, but, in actuality, it is a variation of "got to."

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  • 1 month ago

    'gotta' is not English.  It is American slang.  What language are you learning?

    Source(s): I'm English
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  • Speed
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I have to admire people whose mastery of English as a second language reaches this level of subtlety.

    I have a car. -> I possess a car. It's mine and I own it.

    I have got a car. -> A car is available for my present use. I don't necessarily own it.

    I got a car. -> I have purchased a car.

    Secondly, which word does the slang "gotta" replace, must or have to?

    In idiomatic English, there's no difference between "must" and "have to" except formality. "Gotta" is a verbal shorthand for "got to."

    I must wash my car = I have to wash my car = I've got to wash my car = I gotta wash my car

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  • 1 month ago

    "I have a car" is correct. "Gotta" can replace "have" as in "I gotta car, let's take mine" or it can be "must" as in "I gotta go" replaces "I must go." It can also be "have to" as in "I gotta stay home and do my homework."

    • Hackenbacker
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Got can replace have. Gotta can ONLY replace got to. Using gotta in place of "got a" is an absurdity.

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