Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 month ago

How did all humans prior to the 1800s survive without hygiene? Did they just lose all their teeth at age 25 and die by age 35?

7 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    They had hygiene, just not GOOD hygiene. And yes, a lot of them did lose their teeth and die young. But you shouldn't assume they all did, or that they  had NO hygiene. People bathed and took care of their teeth then, too. And they cleaned their environments. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Up until the beginning of the 20th century average life span of the human male was 47. 1 in 5 children never made it to their 5th birthday .So what you are alluding to isn't far off. 

    • Tim D
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      It is because 20% of children died before age 5 that the average is low, average lifespan of those that made it past infant was higher.

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  • PAMELA
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Not all of them,but hygiene was not important then, elizabeth I lost most of her teeth, and the ones she had were black, due to her sweet tooth, she lived until she was 71, she was thought to be weird as she had a bath once a month, that was considered too much then, most peasants would not bathe during their whole lives and would just wash their face and hands.

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  • Gert
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Many did.............

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  • 1 month ago

    They did have hygiene. The Babylonians were using soap 4,000 years ago and public bathing occurred all throughout history. The Romans were famous for it. It was seen as a critical part of urban infrastructure. Hell the Vikings looked down on the English as they weren't as hygienic as they were. Most people live near water so even without facilities they did wash themselves. 

    For their teeth, they were fine. The largest cause of dental decay comes from sugar and the sugar of ancient diets consisted of honey and fruit. Unlike today where we put refined sugar in bloody everything, they'd didn't have a lot and it was natural sugars which is far, far, far healthier.

    The problem wasn't hygiene, it was medicine and microbiology. It was when those two fields became more and more developed with science that we saw an explosion in life expectancy.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Turns out that hygiene did exist before the 1800s.

    EDIT @A&EW not at all, there were bathhouses in every town in Europe

  • 1 month ago

    Yes. I believe that was pretty close to life expectancies then.

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