Was H.P. Lovecraft a white nationalist?

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  • Chris
    Lv 6
    3 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Clearly yes. He favoured the "blue-eyed fishers" which we as children in the Sixties visiting Kingsport had to demonstrate to that old man on the pavement before we could look at the tiara inside the store behind him with all those bas-reliefs of merfolk all over it. He called other races "of dusky hue" and even as early as 1919 with the grove of Ashtoreth story he talked about thick Semitic lips and reversion to heathenish practises because of the main character's partial Jewish ancestry. 

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  • 3 months ago

    No. He suffered xenophobia and was very reclusive and paranoid. Mental health and madness ran in his family, and I can wager a bet that he suffered social anxiety and psychosis and feared outsiders. 

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    • Huh?
      Lv 7
      3 months agoReport

      I don't think he suffered from psychosis but he had some sort of breakdown in his early teens.  I think he might have had relatively mild Asperger's.

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  • Huh?
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    No.  He was very racist even by the standards of his time, and he hankered back to New England as an idealised British colony, but he was also a strict materialist and convinced atheist.  His views moderated somewhat as he got older, and by the time he died he was a strong supporter of Roosevelt's New Deal. 

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    No.  He was fairly xenophobic, but not a white nationalist.  He also admitted later in life that he was wrong to have been so xenophobic.  He was planning to change his writing to reflect that, but died before doing so.

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  • JerryL
    Lv 6
    3 months ago

    no he wasnt thats a lie that was told to you

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  • 3 months ago

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._P._Lovecraft

    and

    Lovecraft was a strong and antireligious atheist; he considered religion not merely false but dangerous to social and political progress." As such, Lovecraft's cosmicism is not religious at all, but rather a version of his mechanistic materialism. Lovecraft thus embraced a philosophy of cosmic indifferentism.

    Cosmicism - Wikipedia

    • Sir Caustic
      Lv 6
      3 months agoReport

      Not exactly what was asked, though, Elaine. Was it?!

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  • 3 months ago

    He did write the poem "On the Creation of N*****s", which he described how black people were lesser beings than human.

    His views were fairly more explicit in his letters:

    "Flip through them and you’ll find the author bemoaning Jews as “hook-nosed, swarthy, guttural-voiced aliens” with whom “association ... was intolerable”; New York City’s “flabby, pungent, grinning, chattering n*****s”; and New England’s “undesirable Latins—low-grade Southern Italians and Portuguese, and the clamorous plague of French-Canadians.” In 1922, he wrote that he wished “a kindly gust of cyanogen could asphyxiate the whole gigantic abortion” of New York City’s Chinatown, which he called “a ******* mess of stewing mongrel flesh.” In another letter, he wrote, “In general, America has made a fine mess of its population and will pay for it in tears amidst a premature rottenness unless something is done extremely soon.”"

    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/...

    "He warned of “the Jew [who] must be muzzled” because “[he] insidiously degrades [and] Orientalizes [the] robust Aryan civilization.” His sympathies with rising fascism were equally transparent. “[Hitler’s] vision . . . is romantic and immature,” he stated after Hitler became chancellor of Germany. “I know he’s a clown but god I like the boy!”"

    https://lithub.com/we-cant-ignore-h-p-lovecrafts-w...

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    i think he was infected with the same kind of general xenophobia as practically everybody else in his time. 

    if you read one or two of his stories, you might notice that he had maybe just a little fear of exotic and unknown things in general....

    no i've never heard he went out of his way to espouse anything as brain damaged as white nationalism though.  he actually comes across, at least to me, as being probably more open minded, than i suspect people around him would generally have been, around that time

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