why did the saducees say there is no resurrection and Yet Jesus was the resurrection according to bible new testament?

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  • 2 months ago

    They knew who was writing the NT and also knew all that they wrote was and remains bullsheit lies.

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  • 2 months ago

    The Sadducees were an Old Testament group of church leaders. They interpreted their own scriptures differently from the Pharisees. The Sadducees were wrong.

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    • Michael
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      They rejected the many oral traditions observed by the Pharisees as well as other Pharisaic beliefs. They did not believe in the resurrection or in the existence of angels. They opposed Jesus.​—Mt 16:1; Ac 23:8.

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  • 2 months ago

    God placed a veil over the mind of the Jews so they could not understand. When the fullness of the Gentiles come in, then all Israel will be saved.

    Source(s): romans
  • lillie
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    It seems that right after Pentecost it was the Sadducees who figured chiefly in the persecution of the apostles, “being annoyed because they were teaching the people and were plainly declaring the resurrection from the dead in the case of Jesus” as well as because with their preaching the apostles seemed ‘determined to bring the blood of Jesus upon their heads’. (Acts 4:1, 2, 19; 5:17, 28, 29,)     

    Source(s): New World Translation Bible Watchtower magazine
    • so these apostles, taught the resurrection, and islam calls them muslims

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  • 2 months ago

    The historic origins of the Saducees explains such views. It all began after the Maccabees lost their leader Judas Maccabeus in a battle in 160 BC. The Jews were then once again brought under Seleucid domination. But in 142 BC Syria granted Judea semi-independence, and for most of the following century the Jewish people were self-governing under the Hasmonean dynasty, the descendants of the Maccabees.  

     

    As time went on, the Hasmoneans embraced Hellenistic [Greek] perspectives and policies. In violation of Old Testament law, the ruler was also the high priest. Not surprisingly, given this concentration of power, corruption and abuses quickly arose among the Hasmonean rulers. The party of the Pharisees came into view at this time, opposing hellenization and the singular power of the ruler. The Sadducees also appeared, supporting hellenization and the power of the priesthood.  

     

    In Jesus’ era, the Pharisees were a non-political lay movement within Judaism. They attempted, by rigorous examination of the details of the OT law, to make the law accessible and practical to people seeking to be obedient Jews. They attached great importance to the oral traditions which they claimed Moses had passed down to them. They argued that if the law, including the oral traditions, were obeyed by all, the nation would be purged of sin and God would establish his kingdom over all the nations. The Pharisees were very influential in the local synagogue communities. Their traditions developed into the rabbinic writings known as the Mishnah and the Talmud. They strongly believed in the resurrection of the dead as indicated in the Hebrew scriptures.  

     

    The Sadducees were more influential in the Temple worship in Jerusalem, and in the Sanhedrin, the Jewish high council as they were made up of the priestly class. They were powerful aristocrats and mediators between Rome and Israel. They did not believe in the resurrection of the dead because the Pentateuch had primary authority for them (the 1st 5 books of Moses). They rejected the oral tradition so cherished by the Pharisees. They did not believe in angelic beings as the Pharisees did. They rejected the sovereignty of God and the concept of final judgment.  

     

    Amazingly, despite their antithesis to each other, they came together to attack Jesus. Both groups wanted Jesus of Nazareth put to death because He fearlessly pointed out the errors in both groups. With the destruction of Jerusalem and its temple (foretold by Jesus some 40 years before it happened), the Sadducees disappeared from the scene, leaving no written records.

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    • Annsan_In_Him
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      All the NT docus (perhaps with the exception of Revelation) were written BEFORE the destruction of Jerusalem in A.D. 70. The far more ancient Old Testament prophecies about a coming Messiah were written over 400 years + before Jesus was even born.

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  • 2 months ago

    Because the Saduccees rejected all the prophets after Moses. They held that Moses was the greatest prophet there ever would be, and so they stuck to the books of Moses.

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  • 2 months ago

    That concept must involve error on the part of the Sadducees.

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  • 2 months ago

    They did not regard Jesus as the Messiah.

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    • antonius
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      He wasn't that messiah as was hoped for in the OT. They knew it was nothing but a fictional story with a fictional messiah.

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  • 2 months ago

    Different religions, different views. Jesus never said anything about virgins like the Muslims did so was he wrong?

  • 2 months ago

    Not sure.  They simply did not believe in either resurrection or angels.  Perhaps it was because they only accepted the written law of Moses.  That is why, in defense of the resurrection, Jesus came at them with a quote from the law of Moses - a part of the Hebrew Scriptures that they accepted.  Exodus 3:6.

    Hannah J Paul

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    • Michael
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      A prominent religious sect of Judaism made up of wealthy aristocrats and priests who wielded great authority over the activities at the temple. They rejected the many oral traditions observed by the Pharisees as well as other Pharisaic beliefs.

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