Why would my friend get angry over the fact I asked how others apply thermal compound on their CPUs?

I understand the correct way of applying thermal compound between the CPU and heatsink is a pea sized blob that is then spread over by the heatsink, but why would he say this to me "Your a tech yeah? Should u know what the right way of putting it?" when I stated I like to spread mine all over the CPU before applying the heatsink? I understand the compound has 3 functions which is to act as a conductor for electricity, a heat conductor between the CPU and heatsink, and as a compound for eliminating air bubbles.

I'm just following my preference when it comes to applying thermal compound.

9 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    Some people are just angry jerks. Ignore him

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  • 2 months ago

    Monkeys and shoes you can not lose 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    "conductor for electricity": False!

    "a heat conductor between the CPU and heatsink": True, which is achieved by "eliminating air bubbles", between the uneven surfaces of the IHS and Heatsink. The surfaces of the IHS and Heatsink are never perfect.

    Thermal Compound isn't nearly as heat conductive as copper or aluminum, which is why you want to use as little as possible.

    Yeah, the pea sized drop or line method is probably the easiest and the best. There's less chance of trapping any air with the pea sized drop method because the air has a better chance or rolling out as the compound is spread by the mounting pressure of the heatsink.. I've used the spread method plenty of times and the end result is about the same or a degree or two higher than the pea method. The only problem with the spread method is there is a higher chance of trapping air. 

    The Pea sized drop method won't work on larger processors like threadripper and it's not greatly effective on Intel's lga2011, 2011 v3, and 2066 processors which have a larger IHS. It's better to go with the line method.

    People who have limited tech experience think things like applying compound should be done a certain way. I've applied compound hundreds of times, so much to the point that I buy compound in 20g tubes. It doesn't matter how it's applied, as long a there is a thin layer between the IHS and heatsink. The excess will run off and make a mess. A few small air pockets won't make that much of a difference.

      

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  • Adrian
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Your method is correct, 100%. Spreading manually produces air pockets due to slightly uneven surfaces. Air is an insulator, causing less heat transfer.

    Using a peas size drop (or a bit bigger) and pressing it with the heatsink causes the compound to spread outwards from the center (hottest spot) to the edges, and it is almost impossible to introduce air pockets. If there are irregularities in the surfaces, letting the heatsink spread the compound allows it to fill those irregular spaces - again, no air pockets.

    Compound is NOT designed to conduct electricity, it's sole purpose is to transfer heat between CPU and heatsink.

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You know your friend more than us so we won't know exactly why. Perhaps he's just a know-it-all person who doesn't want anybody else go against his opinion. Maybe he's going trough a tough time and his way of coping with it is to pour out his anger on you. Perhaps he's just slighted you didn't ask his opinion first. Lots of things but that's besides the point. You get that thermal compound on your processor and save your computer. Your friendship, whether or not you still want it, can be dealt with later, with a bottle of beer or a can of ice cream. Yes?

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  • 2 months ago

    There is no correct way, everybody has their favorites.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Your friend is just concerned your foolish experiment will overheat your processor, since you don't seem to be the type of person who likes to follow directions.  Back in college I burned up a $200 CPU screwing around with thermal paste and heatsinks.  

    Be mindful the actual CPU chip is located under the metal cap in the center of the physical processor.  It's only about the size of your fingernail and is where all the heat is generated.  If you spread it around you end up creating bubbles in the center where cooling is needed the most.  Too much thermal compound also creates issues too. Regardless assuming you don't damage it you can tell who's processor is running the coolest and know if you made a mistake.

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  • 2 months ago

    Are you sure he was angry? Too many people think that sarcastic ridicule is anger. "Why do gotta hate?" It really isn't hate, but people today just have to get over emotional about any kind of criticism. Sounds to me like you know what heat sink compound does and what you need to be careful about. It is very possible that he was taught one way and never deviates from that method and you do it differently. By placing the blob in the center, it spreads outwards and eliminates those problems that you described that are inherently there the way that you like to do it. I am fairly certain that he is fed up with someone who collects the same rate of pay as him, yet cannot perform one simple task in the correct manner. By his reckoning (and mine too), you should review the proper procedure and begin anew.

    • Jan2 months agoReport

      I once asked if I can put an AMD CPU into an Intel socket, does that help?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You're a fkn idiot!

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