Is there any scientific reason of how the earth was created?

15 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago

    The creation of the earth is not within the domain of 'forensic' science. Noone was there to observe it; it cannot be repeated or tested. What happened cannot be proved.

    It is within the domain of 'historical' science. We can look at evidence today and try to piece together what may have happened in the past. This will only ever be a conjecture from a scientific point of view.

    Some people conjecture that Earth was created as a result of the Big Bang, billions of years of stellar evolution.  However this is s philosiphical point of view that does not fit with actual evidence.  We know that clouds of dust simply do not coalesce unde the weight of their own gravity.

    There is abundant evidence that the solar system is young. Eg the recession of our moon, the decay of earth's magnetic field; the amount of salt in the oceans; the geological activity on planets and their moons; the amount of helium in the rocks and the atmosphere, etc, etc.

    The only way we can be sure of the age of the earth is from the eye-witness account of the Creator. Just 6 thousand years ago by His own account.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    yes, maybe you should try reading a science book...

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    The earth was formed from the remnants of a star that exploded after it ran out of fuel to burn. The earth is part of the solar system, and the entire solar system formed when the remains of the exploded star collided with each other because of gravitational force. Stars are formed when hydrogen atoms come together because of gravity. When hydrogen collides with one another with sufficient force (e.g. inside a star), it results in nuclear fusion, forming helium. When all the hydrogen are used up, heavier and heavier elements are formed by nuclear fusion, until one day, the elements that are formed can no longer fuse and the star explodes, if it is big enough. If it is a small one like the sun, it may end its life as a white dwarf. Of course no one knows where all the matter in the universe came from or when the universe began. The Big Bang theory is one explanation but it is not gospel truth and even it cannot explain what supposedly existed before the so-called Big Bang.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 1 month ago

    In astrophysics, accretion is the accumulation of particles into a massive object by gravitationally attracting more matter. Grains eventually stick together to form mountain-size (or larger) bodies called planetesimals. Collisions and gravitational interactions between planetesimals combine to produce Moon-size planetary embryos (protoplanets) over roughly 0.1–1 million years. Finally, the planetary embryos collide to form planets over 10–100 million years. The planetesimals are massive enough that mutual gravitational interactions are significant enough to be taken into account when computing their evolution. Growth is aided by orbital decay of smaller bodies due to gas drag, which prevents them from being stranded between orbits of the embryos. Further collisions and accumulation lead to terrestrial planets or the core of giant planets.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    In a nutshell, stars fused hydrogen and helium to form heavy elements, they exploded and distributed these heavy elements in vast clouds, the sun formed due to gravitational collapse of hydrogen and helium clouds, pulled these heavy elements into orbit around it, then they clumped together under gravity to form rocky planets like the Earth.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Yes - Gravity.

    Interstellar dust and hydrogen pulled into a cloud by gravity; the more it's pulled together the stronger the gravitational effects.

    Most of it forms a Sun at the centre of the cloud, other smaller clumps form planets, moons, asteroids etc.

    The compression as each mass forms also heats it. Initially the larger masses would have molten cores and with the sun, the pressure and heat are sufficient to start a fusion reaction.

    Allow things to settle and the planets cool for a few million years, and if conditions are just right, complex molecules like proteins and amino acids can start to form spontaneously from the mix of substances in the water and atmosphere, and combine in various ways.

    Earth is such a planet were conditions were just right - otherwise we would not be here to discuss such things!

    The video below seems to also explain the formation of the solar system and planets in a reasonable way:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4yzTRT958s

    Youtube thumbnail

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • CRR
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Standard planet-formation models have been unable to reconstruct the distributions of the Solar System's small, rocky planets and asteroids in the same simulation. A new analysis suggests that it cannot be done.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Dv8s
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Yes, it's called the big bang theory.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    definitely there isn't a REASON,

    but definitely there is a well understood explanation, look it up on YOUTUBE.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.