first time building a gaming pc.Does getting a larger case make things easier? I can get a mid or full tower case but I'm not sure?

I'm getting the B450 TOMAHAWK MAX Motherboard

14 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    A full sized case gives you more room to work in as mentioned and more room for air to circulate. You can usually fit in bigger cooling solutions and more peripherals, more hard drive bays, just... more in general.

    If you think that's what will work best for you, then by all means go for a bigger case if space and cost aren't an issue.

    Does that mean smaller cases are worse? Not necessarily. A full-sized case is complete overkill for a basic build. Most builders can probably house their components fine in a smaller mid-tower, which is as it sounds, a case that's not small and not big, it's somewhere in the middle.

    Basically I would take a look at your options and compare the features of the cases you want, and decide which will work best for you based on what you plan on putting inside it.

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  • 1 month ago

    Everyone on this thread is offering some really good, solid advice.  They pretty much said everything that was running through my mind.  The only thing I would like to add though is that having the Plexiglass makes it easier to see the parts in the case when cracking it open to troubleshoot. No flashlight needed unless you are sitting in the dark. :()

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  • Shadow
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    Larger cases just make it easier to assemble everything and fit more stuff inside. If it's not necessary, (as in the board fits into the case you choose) then get a normal case.

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  • 1 month ago

    If you buy a large case, you can upgrade cooiing to a liquid system.  The pump and radiator, hoses take a bit of space, more than just a fan or two.

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    A larger case will give you more options for upgrades later. It also allows for better air circulation inside the CPU. It's not just the ability to add more fans. It's physically more air to work with that is readily available to cool down your precious computer parts.

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  • P
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Most people would tell you to get the larger case, which is sound advise for a first build.  That said the bigger cases may not always be physically a great look for your room. Unless you are putting in the bigger graphics card and aftermarket cooling systems you won't ever need the space.  There's also hassles in some cases where cables might not even be long enough to go across the case for certain things or forces you to avoid hiding the cable.  There is an art to building a more compact system depending on how small you go.  Some people enjoy that challenge others would rather just buy the massive case and avoid the puzzle. 

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  • 1 month ago

    The advantage to the full tower case is it is larger and has more room.  If you plan (or decide later) to add more than one hard drive, multiple fans. another DVD or other type of drive, an SSD drive, etc., having more room in the case is good.

    If everything you plan to add will fit in the mid size case, it will work for you also.

    Only you know what you plan to put into the case.

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  • Dick
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Some thoughts ... Get a full sized case if you have room for it where you use your computer. Here's why. If you're going to build a gamer or even a nice high end computer, you'll keep it healthy with plenty of fans. This is my setup: Corsair water cooler on the CPU that has two stacked fans pulling cool air in from the back; two fans in the front pulling air in; 1 fan on the left panel pulling air in. Lots of cool air from the room coming in! I have two fans mounted in the top pulling the warm air out. Picture all that air flow going on. My CPU is an i5-9600k (3.7 to 4.6 GHz) and 16 GB of RAM. I run a program called Core Temp that gives me the temps of all 6 cores in the CPU. With the water cooler and the additional fans I constantly see high 80's and low 90's F for temps. The water cooler and fans work ... don't forget that!!! Motherboard ... didn't look up that MoBo you want but it should have 3 or 4 fan headers in addition to the CPU fan header!!! That is critical. A great case with room for plenty of fans and no place to plug them in just doesn't work. RAM ... at least 8 GB or 16 if you can swing it. Those are my quick thoughts. Good luck with your build!!!

    Source(s): 34 Years Computer Experience & IT Support
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  • 1 month ago

    Not always.

    I have 2 large cases that are equal in size. One is easy to work with and the other isn't. These are two older Cooler Master cases which are the HAF 932 (easy) and the Storm Trooper (difficult). That and I had come across a used Antec 1200 case which wasn't the easiest to work with. The Antec 1200 is very large and it was popular about 10 years ago.

    A lot of it depends on layout and how much room they give you to install parts like coolers. Other factors to look at is how easy/difficult it is to install additional fans, and a big one IMHO is the room they give you for cable management. 

    I built my brother a system with the Phanteks Enthoo Pro, and despite that case being Plain Jane, it was easy to work with. 

    Newer cases on the market come with power supply shrouds, removable Hard Drive bays, and mounting options for AIO and sometimes custom loops. Also, most of the cases on the market lack 5.25" disk drive bays. They mostly come with tempered glass or plexi-glass side panels for showing off the hardware and RGB. I'd say look for a case that can accommodate three 120mm fans or two 140mm fans at the front and top, and a 140mm fan at the rear.  Many cases will only come with 2 or 3 fans so you might have to shop for more 140mm or 120mm fans.

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes, it would be easier for cable management. Perhaps water cooling as well.

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