I'm on SSI someone claimed me in 2018 but not 2019. I'm on SSI so I'm not required to file this year. Can i still get my stimulus payment? ?

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  • 1 month ago

    The IRS will not send you a stimulus payment until they know that you are not a dependent.

    When they look at your tax record they see that you were dependent in 2018 and you have not filed a 2019 tax return so they have no way of knowing that you are no longer dependent.

    Even if your parent (or whoever claimed you in 2018) has already filed a 2019 return, the IRS does not know whether or not someone else is going to claim you. For all they know, you may have moved to a different relative's house and that person will claim you but hasn't filed yet. Or maybe your parents (or whoever claimed you in 2018) simply forgot to include you and they're going to file an amended return.

    So until you file a tax return declaring that you are not a dependent they don't know for sure that you're not. All they know is that as of 2018 you were a dependent.

    So you won't get a stimulus check until you make sure the IRS knows that you are no longer a dependent. You could do that in any of these ways:

    Option 1: File a 2019 tax return stating that you are independent (you can do this even if you have no taxable income to report). Some people will tell you that its illegal to file a frivolous return, but if  you are filing to establish yourself as a non-dependent then the return has a valid purpose and is not frivolous even if you have $0 taxable income and $0 tax owed and $0 refund.

    Option 2: Register on their non-filers tool on the IRS website. However I believe the deadline to do this has passed. Watch the news to see if they reopen it but otherwise its too late for this option.

    Option 3: wait until early 2021 and file a 2020 tax return. Even if you have no taxable income you'll qualify for a tax credit to make up for the missed stimulus payment.

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  • 1 month ago

    You should, yes.  

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  • 1 month ago

    So file. You are allowed (as long as the 1040 is not frivolous) and then the government will have your info,

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