Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 month ago

Is "the catcher in the rye" a narcissistic novel?

8 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    Yeah when I first read that I sort of got that feeling also. Holden Caulfield was just so self-absorbed and full of himself. I guess that’s what JD Salinger was trying to get across. How self-absorbed people can be at that age of their life. Especially somebody from that kind of background that Holden Caulfield was from. White upper middle class, self-absorbed, entitled,  etc. Maybe it was also a reflection of that aspect of Salinger’s own personality...the narcissistic part

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      A narcissistic character in a novel does not mean the novel itself is "narcissistic".

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    I honestly hated Catcher in the Rye, but that's just me. 

    I would have to say definitely yeah, though

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Holden wants to be a person who catches children who fallout of the rye to their peril....does not seen narcissistic that way.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    I like "Caught Her in the Raw" bettter

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • j153e
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Excessive self-love is not particularly Holden's shtick; rather, Salinger's novel pits teenage angst about finding self against a world of perceived phonyness.  The novel chimes in with the existential Zeitgeist of the 1940s.  "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and "Back to the Future" are 1980s golden age movies of teenage Holdens moving beyond Salinger's perspective, yet courting narcissism inasmuch as they're adolescent fantasies of it's-all-about-me empowerment against authority (ironically, written by adults for teens).  Thus Salinger's period voice of bewildered comparative powerlessness is perhaps more authentically reflective of Everyman's coming-of-age, i.e. when the teen is not a fantastic Superhero.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No. The protagonist is but that does not necessarily make the book narcissistic.  Many critics fail to comprehend the difference. 

    • Lib.rare.ian
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Please learn the definition of narcissism.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    😄

    Holden Caufield was a narc to you? Really? Why do you think that?

  • Orla
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    How so ?  Please explain....

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.