Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 month ago

What’s the best way to replace the n-word while reading a book out-loud?

Hi! I read out loud to my best friend all of the time and I wanna start reading The Help but I don’t know the best way I can avoid saying words I shouldn’t be (the n-word and things like that). It’s a really great book and he’s never read it or seen the movie! Im not sure if just saying “n-word” while reading is the best way to do it cause it doesn’t flow as well. What do you guys think?

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  • 1 month ago

    I think you're trolling, but just in case you're not, you should just read the words on the page. After all, the author put them there, didn't she? It's silly and pointless to pretend nobody ever used or uses the word.

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  • 1 month ago

    It's a solid question because so many excellent books have that awkward word. I just go with "n-word".

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  • F
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Call the person Nigel.

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  • Tina
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If your best friend has a problem with reading, the best thing you can do for him is to help him with that. If you must read aloud to him, then you have to have a discussion about the language in the book before you start, explaining that the words belong in the book, and they are not to be used in ordinary conversation.

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  • chorle
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Schools have actually considered Changing it in some of Mark Twain's work to "Slave" but they have also considered the impact of the words chosen in that case. 

    My personal opinion is you should use it when reading Huck Finn books and if you are getting killed in the next scene by Django.  It would depend on the context and do let them know your editing it as you read it. 

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      That would be utterly ludicrous.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You could refer to the "tinted folk", or use some phrase such as "dusky maiden".  (Do  not say 'swarthy', that means gyppo.)

  • j153e
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    "N-word" = "bad or badly behaving black person," a "deplorable;" for some people in some periods of the past, "black person" = "bad person," aka the "n-word."  For Stockett's "The Help," would suggest that "bad black person" is a fair translation; or, if that's too tame, "nasty black person" or "worthless black person," etc.  Also depends on the character Stockett has saying the "bad" word; a white of that period would usually use it straight out to = "bad, undesirable, and black."  A "house n-word" might use it more ironically or straight out, depending on their character.  A "field n-word" would tend to use it, in a Stockholm syndrome, to attack other blacks' perceived bad behavior; or, more likely, if the black "field n-word" were disgruntled at "the Man," or "uppity," would tend to use it ironically, much as the modified n-word (ending in "a" is used among gangsters and gangster rap as a "homey" word; this is a typical appropriation of a negative term and turning it into a positive within the group. 

    Other words such as the f-bomb, scatology (s-bomb), etc. are somewhat translatable as "screw you," "crap" or "damn," etc.

    You might find this Juneteenth (June 19th), 2020 release worthwhile (produced by the author of "The Ten Things You Can't Say in America," who is a black person):  https://uncletom.com 

    • Sir Caustic
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      <clap> <clap> <clap> <clap>

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  • 1 month ago

    Read a book that doesn't contain the n-word, you twit. Or tell him to read it himself. Hope this helped.

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      I don't know if you've actually read the book yourself, Sir C. It's an excellent and very instructive read.

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  • 1 month ago

    I think you need to read the book as written. Your friend knows that it's not you choosing to use the word. You can even tell them ahead of time that you personally object to some of the language, but the author chose every word for a reason and you want to respect that.

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