Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 month ago

How conceited is J K Rowling for trademarking the name 'icabog'. She stole it from Ichabod crane. She just changed the last letter.?

She tradmarked the word/name 10 years ago so nobody else could use it. She literally stole the name from the Sleepy Hollow book, changed the last letter, omitted the 'h' and threatened to sue anyone who dared use it.

So conceited.

Saying that, she stole ideas from books like The Worst Witch and Groosham Grange, so I am not surprised at this point.

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  • 1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    I don't think that any person or corporation should own any piece of language (but they didn't ask me).  It's just one of many examples of how human greed overrules  intelligence or equality on a daily basis.  What's next, they're going to try to own our thoughts too?

  • F
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    To be honest the whole Jk Rowling / Harry Potter thing bemuses me. More adults than children seem to be into this garbage.

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    • Lv 4
      4 weeks agoReport

      ..broomgame was done in the film: one might expect more from a billion dlr franchise: especially as it was supposedly sort of central to the film & took up several minutes of screentime; apparently literature & alphabetic character sequences may be attemptedly being redefined by marketing efforts...

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  • 1 month ago

    Clearly you don't understand the principle of stealing. If you steal something from someone, that someone doesn't have it any more.

    And yet Ichabod Crane still has his name ... The Worst Witch still has its plot ...All writers borrow from, or are inspired by, works that have gone before them. Nobody with an ounce of common sense would think of it as 'stealing'.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Ichabod is a name used long before Washington Irving gave it to a certain schoolteacher. It's a name so you can't really accuse her of stealing anything. That's like saying John from Garfield's name was stolen from John the Baptist. 

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    • Tina
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Having made up her mind that Ickabog is the same as Ichabod she cannot seem to grasp that it isn't. Also that her thoughts on J K Rowling are possibly of less interest to J K Rowling herself than she thinks

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  • 1 month ago

    Guess what?  Washington Irving has been dead for 160 and a half years. His works entered the public domain at least 80 years ago. Therefore, ANY author is free to name a character something similar to one of his AND trademark that character. Rowling's copyright to anything she creates in her lifetime will expire 70 years after her death. Trademarks can last indefinitely.

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    • Tina
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      No the name hadn't been used by another author. If it had I don't see how she could have trade marked it.

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  • Tina
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You, if you are the same person who has been complaining about J K Rowling before, seem to have a problem with her, which is rather silly.

    Now let me explain: if the name Ichabod Crane had been invented by Washington Irving Rowling would still not have 'stolen' it - Ickabog is rather different, and doesn't include Crane (by the way, where has she been threatening to sue anyone who dared use it? or have you made that up?)

    But Irving didn't invent the name - Ichabod is a very old name, in fact it occurs in the Bible, and is derived from Hebrew. It means something like 'the glory is departed' and was given to a boy born on the day that the Israelites lost the Ark of the Covenant to the Philistines.

    So 'Ichabod' wasn't the literary creation of Irving, nor did his use of it mean that no one else could ever use it.

    So don't be silly.

    And as I'm sure people have told you before the idea of a school for magic is is quite a common one - "The Little Broomstick" by Mary Stewart was published in 1971 and "The Magic Bedknob" - where Miss Price is learning magic by correspondance course was published in 1943.

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    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Ah, I know now. She dared to hint that the word 'woman' might actually mean something. Well, for every million she loses, she'll gain two million more.

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  • 1 month ago

    First of all it's 'Ickabog'. I don't know whether she trademarked it, but since the word is used to describe a creature she invented, it makes sense. That the word is somewhat similar to an already existing name doesn't really matter. No-one is stopping you from naming your character or son Ichabod.

    Not to mention, she's publishing the story online, free for all to read, and added a drawing competition for kids on top of that.

    It's common for novels to share a common theme and combining "magic", "children", and "schools" is hardly original. The first real fantasy novel I read as a kid was about a boy who went to a school of magic (A Wizard of Earthsea published 1968 before both The Worst Witch and Groosham Grange).

    So no, I really can't get my panties in a knot over this.

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  • Ludwig
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Same with that guy Douglas Adams and the 'Hitchhikers Guide' books. He stole the name 'Marvin the Paranoid Android' from Marvin Luther King.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Who cares? "Egavat. "There you go. Take it and run with it. Trademark that, I'm fine with it. When you have a multi billion dollar franchise to your credit, then you can decide to allow the general public to appropriate your character names and show her up. Throw in a couple more that aren't completely original like "Ajab" or "Hamlid" and see how far that gets you. Perhaps if you people decided to read something that hasn't been on the bestseller list for the past two decades you might have something interesting to say about books and writing. 

    • Lv 4
      4 weeks agoReport

      interesting answer

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    I agree 100% with you

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