WHAT IS THE PROPER INFLATION FOR MY TIRES?

14 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    Whatever it says in your vehicles' manual.

  • Jay P
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    SINCE YOU INSIST ON USING CAPS LOCK, SO WILL I.

    LOOK IN YOUR OWNER'S MANUAL OR ON THE TIRE STICKER ( USUALLY LOCATED ON THE DRIVER'S DOOR, B-PILLAR ON THE DRIVER'S SIDE, AND/OR THE FUEL FILLER DOOR.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Try 30 PSI  front and rear and see how it feels go up or down by 2 PSI

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    check your owners manual................

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  • 2 months ago

    Hint: It's NOT the pressure you see on the sidewall of the tire. It's cleverly hidden in your User Manual and on a plate or sticker inside your driver's side door frame. 

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    yes, very much. Thanks.

  • Ron
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Being nothing more than a spammer, why do you care?

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Even on your driver side door panel or inside door frame will have proper size tire and pressure .

  • Barry
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Look for a sticker on a front door jamb.

  • 2 months ago

    Depends what the tire is used for.

    If this is a street legal motor vehicle then there is a tag inside the driver's door with the manufacturer's recommended inflation pressures. If the vehicle has the same size and load range of tires as what was originally supplied by the manufacturer when the vehicle was new, then the proper inflation is the amount shown on this tag on the door. In many cases the vehicle tag recommends pressures lower than the maximum allowed amount on the tire.

    As an example I have a passenger car that recommends 29 psi in the front tires and 30 psi in the rear, but the tires themselves are rated to handle up to 44 psi.

    I have a heavy duty van that recommends 65 psi on the front and 80 psi on the rear, and the tires are rated for 80 psi. So in this case my rear tires are at their maximum rated pressure, but the front tires are less.

    Running at the tire's maximum (if that's higher than the car's recommended pressure) can significantly reduce traction for emergency maneuvers (shch as swerving to avoid an object), significantly increase stopping distance, decreases tire life and increases the risk of a blowout.

    If these are tires on something other than a motor vehicle - such as a bike or riding lawn mower, then just inflate to the max on the tire and don't worry about it.

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