Internet speed questions?

Is the result from internet speed test already divided for all connected devices or is it the maximum the ISP gives you for your plan? Say I get 50 Mbps from my PC through wifi while my spectrum plan says up to 200, is this normal?

13 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    you should check your internet service provider.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    With the plan you pay for. Which is adequate for home use.

  • 1 month ago

    I have a 50Mbps.

     I was told that I can have 2 devices connected at the same time and both get the top speed. Any amount of connections over 2 and the speed goes down.

    Which means a wireless printer, Roku, Wii, PlayStation,Kindle and all your smart appliances which connect automatically will drain your speed.

  • Shadow
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    The type of connection between your PC and the router is one part of the whole picture. If your plan says up to 200Mbps then there is no guarantee that you'll always get that speed. This is because the service provider has multiple clients connected to the same exchange. This is called a contention ratio. 

    If the contention ratio is 20:1 (20 to 1) then 20 individual clients can connect via one line/exchange. If the line has a max bandwidth of 2000Mbps and 20 clients are connected, the bandwidth is divided equally by each connected client. In this case, each client will receive a maximum of 100Mbps. If only 5 clients are connected, then each will receive 400Mbps but will be limited to 200Mbps based on the plan chosen.

    There is a guaranteed speed which basically a minimum speed that the line will provide. If the minimum is 50Mbps, then regardless how may clients are connected, you will receive a minimum of 50Mbps up to a maximum of 200Mbps.

    Then the router itself will determine the speed between the router and each connected client on the router. The contention ratio of the router will apply here. The more devices (clients) you have connected to your router that are busy utilising it, the slower the connection each device receives. 

    Then the environment is a factor as well. If you're using a cable, then the environment wont affect you, but with WiFi, the more objects between the device and the router, the weaker, and subsequently slower, the connection will be. Concrete, plaster, plastic and similar materials absorb the signal waves from the router. Metal will deflect the waves.

    Certain WiFi standards provide stronger waves or more waves in total. Others provide waves that can penetrate objects better. The 5Ghz bandwidth, 802.11ac and ax, are stronger and better at penetrating objects than the 2.4Ghz bandwidth, 802.11b/g and n.

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  • 1 month ago

    With wired, directly off the router, you should get near that 200 from Spectrum. 

    Your 50 Mbps WiFi just means you have a less then good router.  You get what you pay for.  My routers usually cost near $200.  I just now got 204 Mbps wired and there is my nephews router between me and the modem.  My phone just got 202 Mbps.  The router is an Asus RT-AC88U.   The one I came through is essentially the same model but it does AX (WiFi 6)

    If you spent $50 on your router, plan on a new one.  Plan ahead.  That means, get one that is WiFi 6.  Next phone will connect to it faster than anything can connect to my current one.

  • 1 month ago

    200 MBPS is wired internet,Wifi is always slower.Also max wifi speed depends on equipment you use:

    Protocol v    Theoretical Maximum Bitrate

    802.11b        11 Mbps

    802.11a        54 Mbps

    802.11g        54 Mbps

    802.11n        600 Mbps

    802.11ac        6,933 Mbps

    802.11ax         9,608 Mbps

    Router and laptop have to be the same type

    To read more.........

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    The speed the service provides is the BEST speed that you would get if you have a DIRECT CONNECTION - so not wifi.  Connection to the internet with an ethernet cable is ALWAYS going to give you a better (faster) connection.

    Next - your router can also impact your speed.  The service being given by your provider might be better than what your router can handle.  Your router can actually slow your service if it isn't the right one for the speeds of the incoming service.  Make sure your router is up to date.  To a small degree, the number of devices using the network can slow the network slightly - but it does not actually "divide" the service.  It would be possible for 10 devices to all get a signal of 50 to 75 on a service that provides speeds of up to 200. The closer you are to your wifi signal - the better your connection will be.  Each device will get a speed and signal based on the device's capability, how close it is to the source of the wifi signal, and how many devices are trying to use the wifi network at one time.  But even turning off all other devices and making sure only one device is running doesn't always improve the speed of the wifi signal enough to make a significant difference.Some PC's still have the slot to connect via an ethernet cable.  If your computer does - then get an ethernet cable and see what speed you get with a direct connection.  If the speed is still below what your plan claims, then call your provider and get advice.   To get better wifi signals in your home, look into better equipment and/or signal boosting equipment.BTW - my home has three computers, four gaming systems, a smart TV, three smart phones, and a blu-ray player that all connect to our internet service.  On any given day, at least three to six of these things are connected at one time and we never have speed issues with any of them.  (My service is with Comcast with a speed of up to 200)

  • 1 month ago

    maybe you should talk to your internet service provider about it

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Both. If other devices in your house are downloading and uploading, the speedtest results will be inaccurate. Like you said, your plan says "up to." It's not a guarantee, and depending on where you live and the time of day, you may never get that much even under ideal conditions.

  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    i would talk to your internet service provider about it

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