Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 month ago

Is it true that there might be a copy of the Earth that is always on the opposite side of the Sun, which is why we never knew it was there?

13 Answers

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  • D g
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It is impossible there is more to orbital motion than the pull of the sun the other planets affect each other

  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It's not possible for many reasons.  An earth-sized planet would exert gravitational influence on other planets such as Venus and Mars.  This influence would easily be detected.

    Additionally, we had sent space probes to the other planets that used gravity assists from Venus.  NASA's Magellan mission to Mercury is an example.  Had there been another Earth, the engineers would have to account for it when designing the trajectory, but, of course, they didn't, yet the Magellan arrived safely at Mercury and successfully completed its mission.

  • 1 month ago

    The Parker solar probe successfully orbited the sun - and the voyager probe sent back photographs of our solar system.

    Even if neither of those was convincing, we would definitely know if there was an object as massive as the Earth on the other side of the sun due to gravity.

  • 1 month ago

    This idea goes back to Pythagoris, but is physically impossible.  If an Earth mass planet were at that location, it and Earth would both spiral into the Sun in a bit over 6 months.  Besides which, even were it at the stable Lagrangian point avoiding that fate, its gravitational effects on Venus, Mercury and Mars would have been detected centuries ago.

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  • 1 month ago

    No, that is not possible. Its gravity would affect the other planets. And our space probes would easily have seen it. And it's orbit could not be exactly like Earth's, so it would eventually crash into earth. 

  • 1 month ago

    No.

    That ridiculous movie was quite possibly one of the worst I have ever seen. Although it may have improved after I switched it off about a quarter of the way through. I am not about to watch it again to find out.

  • 1 month ago

    No.  Eventually, one planet or the other would 'catch up' to it's twin, due to the small effects of gravity from Mars, Jupiter, and planets beyond. 

    And, then, there's the Solar System's "Self Portrait", taken by Voyager - showing all 9 planets (Pluto was a planet at the time the image was made) - and, it shows no planet on the opposite side of the sun from Earth. 

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  • 1 month ago

    No - it's not possible for a planet to remain hidden.  Planetary orbits aren't circular and their orbital speeds aren't constant - 2 planets in the same orbit would have to be visible to each other at times.

  • 1 month ago

    No.  This might have been true 100 years ago, but now we've got astronomical probes taking pictures from a long, long way from Earth, and we've got a model of the solar system where the errors are meters --- no way a perturber the mass of Earth could be missed.  Near Earth asteroids are perturbed by the Earth and are definitely not perturbed by another object on the other side of the Sun.

    Anyway, such an orbit is unstable.

  • 1 month ago

    No, it is not true.  A "hidden planet" still has gravity, and that gravity would affect the orbits of Mercury, Venus, and Mars. We can measure the orbits of those planets very precisely, and don't detect any influence of any hidden planet.

    Besides that, if the hidden planet was in an orbit even 0.01% off from Earth's, it would come around to our side in less than 2,500 years.

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