Dirac
Lv 4
Dirac asked in EnvironmentGlobal Warming · 3 months ago

Snow has occurred every month of the year on Mauna Kea, so why do deniers make a big deal of October snow there?

The elevation at the summit is almost 14,000 feet, so I'm not sure why they're so surprised by snow there.

Update:

Why does the troll keep quoting Dr. Rubin from the Geology and Geophysics Department of the University of Hawaii? Wouldn't it make more sense to talk someone from the meteorology department? And what is "rare"?  Again, this is nothing new, happening at a single place on the globe, big deal.

Update 2:

Anonymous, you say I don't have two jobs.  There's no way for you to know that without knowing who I am, so what is my name?

7 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    If I see a bum lying around all day, I don't need his name to know he's jobless.

  • Koshka
    Lv 5
    3 months ago

    I had to google high altitude cooking and found that according to the elevation on Mauna Kea, the boiling point of water would be 185.9 F or 85.5 C. Where is Sagebrush now?

    Goodbye!

    xx

  • 3 months ago

    Apparently, they don't understand the difference between "rare" and "non-existent."

    How much do you think it would freak them out to know there's actually a SKI AREA in Hawaii - on that very peak?

  • 3 months ago

    If I see a bum lying around all day, I don't need his name to know he's jobless.

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  • 3 months ago

    maybe theyre not used to having it in oct

  • 3 months ago

    A geophysicist who lives in Hawaii says it's rare event in October.  Read the article before commenting, please.

    Attachment image
  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    According to Ken Rubin, professor at the Department of Geology and Geophysics University of Hawaii, Honolulu, this is indeed a rare event.

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