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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 1 month ago

The EU has created a 'Right to repair' law which means technology consumers buy should last for a decade?

But how much of a difference will it make?

11 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    That is NOT what it means. It may make some difference as manufacturers look for ways to cover any increased costs of maintaining parts supplies for 10 years and creating "consumer-friendly" maintenance manuals, not to mention redesign of machines to be repaired "in the field" by consumers or authorized technicians.  The current requirement for a minimum 2-year warranty still applies.

    The products may still fail in due course, as inevitable.  The directive only requires that certain types of household appliance goods (TVs, refrigerators, hair dryers, washing machines, dishwashers, etc) be repairable and have replacement parts available for consumers and repair depots, as an extension of the "ecology" goals of recycle, reuse and repurpose.  The goal is to reduce unnecessary bulk and contamination from discarded machines that might have been more easily repaired, had they been designed with that intent.

    It may take a few more years to adopt rules that encompass technologies such as laptops and mobile phones. 

    Even if the directive doesn't apply in the UK, manufacturers on both sides of the channel will eventually be required to comply for products being sold into the EU and it may be more economical to put forth one design to meet the more stringent choices of both the UK and EU requirements.

    Back in the 80s we designed electrical systems to meet the German safety requirements, since every other country in the world (other than the USA) automatically accepted them as meeting their relevant criteria as well.  There was a special kit in the bill of materials for US customers (different power cord, manual, voltage selection, etc), which only marginally increased the cost, due to the much larger number being delivered in the USA.

  • ?
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    Well, manufacturers must keep parts around for 10 years. I'm guessing the cost of things will increase.

  • 1 month ago

    Well f*ck-all now since that mendacious public-school oaf Johnson has taken us out of the EU!

    We'll be forced to buy American built crap - tasteless chunky design, cheap chinese electrical components inside and assembled by MAGAturd monkeys!

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I think it will have a 15-35% cumulative (not understood right away) decrease in new production sales, which will also have a similar effect on reduction of natural resources necessary to build new technology (an environmental plus).  But much depends on the specific tech.

    As an example lets use something that is less technical ... cars/trucks.  Imagine a world where car manufacturers stopped making spare parts longer than the warranty of the car/truck when bought new.  There would be very few cars on the road older than 5 years, and as a result a world with less cars simply because less people could not afford cars/trucks and all the consumer goods used too transport goods would increase in price too because of the need to buy new trucks so often.

    I am guessing your perspective is from a technophiliac, the type that buys a new phone and computer ever 2-3 years (or sooner) because you want the better technology, not because you technology stops working or can't be repaired.  In your case such a law has no impact, but from a consumers point of view, you only represent about 10% of the market.  

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Back in the day I had a washing machine that, with a few cheap and easy repairs using conventional tools, lasted 15 years. Now, because consumer goods aren't made to last or to be economically or easily repairable I would be lucky if a washing machine lasted even 5 years.  That is the issue the EU law is intended to address.

  • 1 month ago

    I think that's ridiculous. You can't stop technological advancements. Really, how much more top of the line technology do people need in their lives. Besides my computer & phone (both of which are 4 years old). There is nothing else I use personally that needs to be state of the art. My truck in 19 years old and I don't own a tv.

  • 1 month ago

    roflmao.  sure -- at what cost?  technology doesn't last forever and the makers thereof will simply raise prices in the EU by enough to cover expected added costs.  I suggest they begin with a 35pc across the board price increase and let consumer scream to their governments

  • Sandy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    back in the day, companies built things (not technological) to last. it was a point of pride to make their products, and for consumers to buy them. but companies realized, they weren't making any money because there was no repeat business, so they started making things with "built-in obsolescence", which means they break down and it costs so much to repair them, it's better to just buy a new one. now apparently, the EU needs to make a law so consumers are protected. with capitalism, the market decides things like this. consumers won't buy a badly made product, so that company goes out of business. end of story.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It might force companies to manufacture better products. That would be useful, wouldn't it?

  • 1 month ago

    Consumers ought to be able to  expect consumer products to last beyond the "limited" guarantee periods that manufacture seem to have  learned to be able to manufacture to  -- that is, their product last the year of warranty , but then break down shortly thereafter .

    And manufacturers will be required to supply spare parts to the consumer , for 10 years or more , and not put obstacles in the way of repairing their products.

    So these changes will make some difference .

    But no one can  expect 10 year warranties ,per se. 

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