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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 month ago

Did they know space shuttle Challenger was defective?

18 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes, Engineers from Morton-Thiokol (O-ring Manufacturers) knew the freezing temperatures were outside of the STS Launch Parameters.  The engineers were adamant about the impending disaster and would not sign off on the launch!  

    Then they (NASA and Morton-Thiokol Management) sent the engineers out and brought the managers in. They overrode the Engineers and approved that launch.  Which ended in disaster.

    See the article below Allen McDonald principle engineer at Morton-Thiokol recently passed away but his story of courage in the face of managerial opposition stands as an example to us all to: "always do the right thing for the right reason at the right time with the right people. [And] you will have no regrets for the rest of your life. "

    See the article below:

  • D g
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    There were a few engineers in NASA that noticed dangerous stuff with the ring but low budgets made it more cost effective to launch even with the dangers 

  • 1 month ago

    NASA  used subconractors like morton thiokol and other sources of uncertain origin  for circuitboards,,objections  and problems were pointed out ,upper declined to order a halt due to administrator pressures to launch,,,,,,,spaceforce,, ordered put into service by trump,,much mocked as is all he accomplished,,get trump 247 is what yahoo has been about for going on 6 years

    the reason for spaceforce creation was loss of life for crews of the challenger,columbia,,and an almost tragedy in re entry  of endeavor,,,,,,, nasa pu dekcuf royally   the problems with nasa were bypassed by contracting with new people,,elon musk,,ole pal trump hater jeff bezos  richest dude in world history wants to send a crew out there too,         damned O rings,nasa ought to have seen that as problematic in cold temps losing seal integrity at launch

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    they did but didnt really care about it

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  • 1 month ago

    The shuttle itself wasn't.  It was a problem with the O-rings on the solid rocket boosters.  The problem was known about; engineers were sounding the alarm on it for some time but those in charge decided to go ahead with it anyway, rationalizing that it had never caused a problem before.

  • 1 month ago

    Yes. The engineers actually pleaded with NASA to call off the launch.

  • 1 month ago

    Engineers knew of the seal issue with the SRBs and after evaluating, went ahead with the launch. They were successful in previous launches but cameras did spot leakages.

  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The Challenger itself wasn't defective, the defect was with the design of the joint between the Solid Rocket Booster segments. 

    The material of O-rings that sealed the joint  got stiff at low temperatures and the O-rings wouldn't seal properly.  NASA got away with it once before when hot exhaust got past the primary O-ring but was contained by the secondary ring.  So, despite the warnings by the engineer from the Morton-Thiokol, the Solid Rocket Booster manufacturer, NASA felt that it had a good handle on the problem.  

    That day the temperature was considerably colder than during the previous cold weather launch and both the primary and secondary O-rings did not seal the joint properly. Video footage of launch shows a puff of black smoke as the O-rings burned through just as the Challenger lifted off coming from the SRB joint that failed.

    The previous shuttle mission, the 61-C flown by Columbia, suffered an unusually long series of weather and technical delays, with two launch attempts scrubbed just seconds before launch.  Challenger was a high profile mission and NASA's leadership was eager to avoid more embarrassing delays and launch on schedule. 

     

    Contrary to CarolOkla's assertion, neither the matters of national security, nor George H.W. Bush's prior post as the CIA Director, nor the onset of Ronald Reagan's Alzheimer's had anything to do with the Challenger (not Columbia) accident.  

  • 1 month ago

    Yes,

    but they were in a funny mood, so they said "Oh what the heck, lets blow it up"

    And they did.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes. The original design for the part that failed did not require o-rings. The engineers knew o-rings were a bad idea. The original part was one solid piece. It was so big that it needed to be shipped by sea since it wouldn’t fit on any road. But the congressman in charge of funding the project gave the contract to a company in his district. That company’s factory wasn’t able ship parts by sea, so they changed the design and made it several shippable pieces that could be assembled where the rocket was. But it required o rings, and the o rings failed. 

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